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  • Monitoring of patients suffering from REM sleep behavior disorder

    Yang, Xiaodong; Shah, Syed Aziz; Ren, Aifeng; Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Jianxun; Hu, Fangming; Zhang, Zhiya; Zhao, Wei; Ur-Rehman, Masood; Alomainy, Akram; et al. (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018-04-16)
    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia that involves involuntary, unwanted, and random movements of a dreaming patient. Typically, these dreams contain violent activities. There is a high likelihood of the patient being injured or hurting his bed-partner as a result of these enactments. Continuous monitoring of sleeping RBD patients can prevent these harmful events through timely intervention. This paper presents a novel method for continuous observation of RBD patients exploiting fine-grained amplitude and phase information of the wireless channel response. The variations in the wireless channel response as a result of different patient movements are assessed and used to identify RBD episodes. The data obtained are classified using a support vector machine and deliver an accuracy level of more than 90%. To the best of authors' knowledge, this is a first attempt at using radio frequency signals to sense RBD in real time.
  • Operationalizing physical literacy: special issue editorial

    Durden-Myers, Elizabeth; Whitehead, Margaret; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Bedfordshire (Human Kinetics Publishers Inc., 2018-12-31)
    Physical literacy has been described as a "longed for concept" and has in turn gained much interest worldwide. This interest has also given rise for calls for physical literacy to be operationalized, providing clarity and guidance on developing physical literacy informed practice. Operationalizing physical literacy is crucial in moving the concept forward by providing "substance to the claims made by (physical literacy) advocates." This special issue aims to respond to calls for research to "unpack" physical literacy across a number of areas in pursuit of operationalizing physical literacy in practice. Nine articles are included within this special issue.
  • Physical literacy: throughout the lifecourse

    Whitehead, Margaret (Routledge, 2010-04-07)
    What is physical literacy? What are the benefits of being physically literate? The term 'physical literacy' describes the motivation, confidence, physical competence, understanding and knowledge that individuals develop in order to maintain physical activity at an appropriate level throughout their life. Physical literacy encompasses far more than physical education in schools or structured sporting activities, offering instead a broader conception of physical activity, unrelated to ability. Through the use of particular pedagogies and the adoption of new modes of thinking, physical literacy promises more realistic models of physical competence and physical activity for a wider population, offering opportunities for everyone to become active and motivated participants. This is the first book to fully explore the meaning and significance of this important and emerging concept, and also the first book to apply the concept to physical activity across the lifecourse, from infancy to old age. Physical Literacy - explaining the philosophical rationale behind the concept and also including contributions from leading thinkers, educationalists and practitioners - is essential reading for all students and professionals working in physical education, all areas of sport and exercise, and health.
  • Learning to teach physical education in the secondary school: a companion to school experience

    Capel, Susan; Whitehead, Margaret (Routledge, 2010-09-13)
    What skills are required of secondary student physical education teachers? What are the key areas that these student teachers need to understand? How can current challenges be addressed by these student teachers? Learning to Teach Physical Education in the Secondary School combines underpinning theory and knowledge with suggestions for practical application to support student physical education teachers in learning to teach. Based on research evidence, theory and knowledge relating to teaching and learning and written specifically with the student teacher in mind, the authors examine physical education in context. The book offers tasks and case studies designed to support student teachers in their school-based experiences and encourages reflection on practice and development. Masters level tasks and suggestions for further reading have been included throughout to support researching and writing about topics in more depth. This fully-updated third edition has been thoroughly revised to take into account changes in policy and practice within both initial teacher education and the National Curriculum for Physical Education. The book also contains a brand new chapter on the role of reflective teaching in developing expertise and improving the quality of pupil learning. Other key topics covered include; lesson planning, organisation and management; observation in physical education; developing and maintaining an effective learning environment; inclusive physical education; assessment; developing wider community links; using ICT to support teaching and learning in physical education. Learning to Teach Physical Education in the Secondary School is an invaluable resource for student physical education teachers.
  • Implications for promoting physical literacy

    Durden-Myers, Elizabeth; Green, Nigel R.; Whitehead, Margaret; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Bedfordshire (Human Kinetics Publishers Inc., 2018-12-31)
    This study considers the implications for teachers of physical education of adopting physical literacy as the focus of their work. These implications arise from the philosophical underpinning of the concept, from the definition of physical literacy and are in line with the mission of the International Physical Literacy Association. In the first section of this study, recommendations stemming from the philosophical roots of the concept will be outlined in brief. The other three sections will demonstrate how this philosophical basis and the definition of physical literacy should inform, first, lesson and unit content; second, teaching approaches; and, finally, curriculum planning. Unpacking the implications and what physical literacy looks like in practice is essential if teachers are to begin to incorporate physical literacy within their practice.

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