Now showing items 21-40 of 6337

    • Collaborative working in the resettlement of young people leaving custody

      Olaitan, Paul; Pitts, John; University of Bedfordshire (Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., 2020-06-17)
      Purpose: This paper aims to endeavour to sketch out a blueprint for effective collaborative working in resettlement. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a review of the relevant research and interviews with professionals concerned with the resettlement of young people from custody in organisations and agencies that were partners in the Beyond Youth Custody programme. Findings: Practitioners working on the youth resettlement pathway between custody and community report collaborative practices to be more beneficial both to the young people involved as well as the practitioners themselves, in the conduct of their efforts. Originality/value: To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the originality of this paper consists in its investigation of resettlement practice by consulting those actually engaged in the resettlement process.
    • Cloud services for culture aware conversation: socially assistive robots and virtual assistants

      Recchuto, Carmine; Gava, Luna; Grassi, Lucrezia; Grillo, Alberto; Lagomarsino, Marta; Lanza, Davide; Liu, Zijian; Papadopoulos, Chris; Papadopoulos, Irena; Scalmato, Antonello; et al. (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2020-07-21)
      This paper introduces a new Cloud platform providing services for culturally competent interaction, that has been developed to expand the capabilities of Socially Assistive Robots and virtual assistants interacting with older persons. The rationale behind the proposed architecture is discussed, by outlining key principles as well as the functionalities provided, with a specific focus on verbal interaction. Three case studies, the humanoid robot Pepper, a robotic medicine dispenser Pillo, and a custom-built Android-based virtual assistant, are analyzed in detail, by showing how robots and other assistants may easily access culturally competent Cloud services to expand their interaction capabilities. Transcripts of conversations are reported and commented, in order to outline both the positive features and the limitations of the system.
    • A randomised controlled trial of energetic activity for depression in young people (READY): a multi-site feasibility trial protocol

      Howlett, Neil; Bottoms, Lindsay; Chater, Angel M.; Clark, A.B.; Clarke, T.; David, L.; Irvine, K.; Jones, A.; Jones, J.; Mengoni, S.E.; et al. (BioMed Central Ltd, 2021-01-04)
      Background: Prevalence of depression is increasing in young people, and there is a need to develop and evaluate behavioural interventions which may provide benefits equal to or greater than talking therapies or pharmacological alternatives. Exercise could be beneficial for young people living with depression, but robust, large-scale trials of effectiveness and the impact of exercise intensity are lacking. This study aims to test whether a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of an intervention targeting young people living with depression is feasible by determining whether it is possible to recruit and retain young people, develop and deliver the intervention as planned, and evaluate training and delivery. Methods: The design is a three-arm cluster randomised controlled feasibility trial with embedded process evaluation. Participants will be help-seeking young people, aged 13–17 years experiencing mild to moderate low mood or depression, referred from three counties in England. The intervention will be delivered by registered exercise professionals, supported by mental health support workers, twice a week for 12 weeks. The three arms will be high-intensity exercise, low-intensity exercise, and a social activity control. All arms will receive a ‘healthy living’ behaviour change session prior to each exercise session and the two exercise groups are energy matched. The outcomes are referral, recruitment, and retention rates; attendance at exercise sessions; adherence to and ability to reach intensity during exercise sessions; proportions of missing data; adverse events, all measured at baseline, 3, and 6 months; resource use; and reach and representativeness. Discussion: UK National Health Service (NHS) policy is to provide young people with advice about using exercise to help depression but there is no evidence-based exercise intervention to either complement or as an alternative to medication or talking therapies. UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines suggest that exercise can be an effective treatment, but the evidence base is relatively weak. This feasibility trial will provide evidence about whether it is feasible to recruit and retain young people to a full RCT to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an exercise intervention for depression. Trial registration: ISRCTN, ISRCTN66452702. Registered 9 April 2020.
    • Optimization analysis and implementation of online wisdom teaching mode in cloud classroom based on data mining and processing

      Gao, Jing; Yue, Xiao-Guang; Hao, Lulu; Crabbe, M. James C.; Manta, Otilia; Duarte, Nelson (International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning., 2021-01-16)
      The rapid development of Internet technology and information technology is rapidly changing the way people think, recognize, live, work and learn. In the context of Internet + education, the emerging learning form of a cloud classroom has emerged. Cloud classroom refers to the process in which learners use the network as a way to obtain learning objectives and learning resources, communicate with teachers and other learners through the network, and build their own knowledge structure. Because it breaks the boundaries of time and space, it has the characteristics of freedom, high efficiency and extensiveness, and is quickly accepted by learners of different ages and occupations. The traditional cloud classroom teaching mode has no personalized recommendation module and cannot solve an information overload problem. Therefore, this paper proposes a cloud classroom online teaching system under the personalized recommendation system. The system adopts a collaborative filtering recommendation algorithm, which helps to mine the potential preferences of users and thus complete more accurate recommendations. It not only highlights the core position of personalized curriculum recommendation in the field of online education, but also makes the cloud classroom online teaching mode more intelligent and meets the needs of intelligent teaching.
    • Interactive study of multimedia and virtual technology in art education

      Liu, Quan; Chen, Haiyan; Crabbe, M. James C. (International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning, 2021-01-16)
      Art education an important part of aesthetic education. It is indispensable for the comprehensive and healthy development of human beings. The basic task is to cultivate creative ability, human aesthetics, and appreciation. Art education is conducive to improving the humanistic cultivation of young students, enhancing the spiritual realm of human beings, and cultivating the creative ability of young people. It has irreplaceable social, cultural, and anthropological significance for promoting the comprehensive and healthy development of people. The development of multimedia information technology provides a new teaching method for art education and teaching in a contemporary setting. This teaching method can guide students to optimize or change the methods and concepts of traditional art creation and aesthetic value. However, traditional art education multimedia technology has poor teaching effects due to limited teaching conditions. This requires the use of multimedia technology and other technologies for interactive fusion. Therefore, this paper proposes an interactive fusion model of multimedia and virtual technology, which is verified by the model. It was found that this integrated education method could not only simulate the real environment and expand the cognitive scope of students, but also could promote students’ learning motivation as well as situational and authentic learning experiences.
    • Editorial: Recent advances in 2020 2nd International Symposium on Big Data and Artificial Intelligence

      Crabbe, M. James C.; Li, Rita Yi Man; Dong, Rebecca Kechen; Manta, Otilia; Comite, Ubaldo; Oxford University; Hong Kong Shue Yan University; University of South Australia; Romanian-American University; University Giustino Fortunato (Association for Computing Machinery., 2021-01-16)
      The 2020 2nd International Symposium on Big Data and Artificial Intelligence was held in Johannesburg, South Africa, from October 15 - 16, 2020. It was organized by IETI, IDSAI, the University of Johannesburg (South Africa) and JRFM, with joint support from the Real Estate and Economics Research Lab of Hong Kong Shue Yan University, the Sustainable Real Estate Research Center of Hong Kong Shue Yan University, Shandong University of Finance and Economics (Mainland China), Guilin University of Technology (Mainland China), IAOE (Austria), the Department of Sport and Physical Education of Hong Kong Baptist University, Rattanakosin International College of Creative Entrepreneurship of Rajamangala University of Technology Rattanakosin (Thailand), Algebra University College (Croatia), and the Center for Financial and Monetary Research of Romanian Academy (Romania), University Giustino Fortunato (Italy). ISBDAI is there to discuss the challenges and possible solutions to these important issues. The conference focused on Artificial Intelligence, Computer Science, Cloud Computing, Big Data, the Internet of Things and the Mobile Web. The participants and speakers were from many countries and universities, including Mainland China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Romania, Italy, Singapore, Austria, Croatia, Australia, UK, Congo King, Portugal and Cyprus. The conference received a record 505 submissions, with 115 papers accepted for presentation. Positive recommendations of at least two reviewers were considered by the conference committees for acceptance of manuscripts. The Editors express a special gratitude to all the Committee Members and ACM-ICPS, who worked so speedily, efficiently, and professionally in support of the conference. Finally, on behalf of the Organizing Committee, we would like to thank all the authors, speakers, and participants for contributing to the success of ISBDAI 2020.
    • Cross hashing: anonymizing encounters in decentralised contact tracing protocols

      Ali, Junade; Dyo, Vladimir; University of Bedfordshire (2021-01-16)
      During the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) epidemic, Contact Tracing emerged as an essential tool for managing the epidemic. App-based solutions have emerged for Contact Tracing, including a protocol designed by Apple and Google (influenced by an open-source protocol known as DP3T). This protocol contains two well-documented de-anonymisation attacks. Firstly that when someone is marked as having tested positive and their keys are made public, they can be tracked over a large geographic area for 24 hours at a time. Secondly, whilst the app requires a minimum exposure duration to register a contact, there is no cryptographic guarantee for this property. This means an adversary can scan Bluetooth networks and retrospectively find who is infected. We propose a novel ”cross hashing” approach to cryptographically guarantee minimum exposure durations. We further mitigate the 24-hour data exposure of infected individuals and reduce computational time for identifying if a user has been exposed using k-Anonymous buckets of hashes and Private Set Intersection. We empirically demonstrate that this modified protocol can offer like-for-like efficacy to the existing protocol.
    • Pedagogical love in Finland and Australia: a study of refugee children and their teachers

      Kaukko, Mervi; Wilkinson, Jane; Kohli, Ravi K.S. (Taylor and Francis, 2021-01-05)
      After claiming asylum, refugee children work to re-build their worlds across three dimensions: safety, belonging, and success. This article examines the pedagogical practices that support this work arguing that a key, but under-examined practice draws on what we have termed pedagogical love. Building on a qualitative Finnish-Australian study, we suggest that as refugee students enter schools in their host countries, pedagogical love can be created through teacher-student interactions in a range of ways despite limited shared language. Later, pedagogical practices that foster a nurturing classroom environment and help students to build a sense of belonging become increasingly important. As students settle in their schools and societies, teachers showing a belief both in the child and their contribution to their new society are crucial. We understand that these actions may be described as teachers’ professional duty of care. Yet our findings show that teachers went beyond this duty by opening their minds and hearts to the students’ lived conditions, engaging with their histories, and constantly shaping their pedagogy accordingly. These practices, we argue, are forms of pedagogical love.
    • Building the foundations for academic success: learning from the experiences of part-time students in their first semester of study

      Goodchild, Allyson; Butler, Cathal (Open University, 2020-07-01)
      This article examines the findings from a mixed methods research study exploring part- time students' perceptions of their transition into higher education. Drawing on wider research in the field of transition and utilising Gale and Parker's (2014) conceptual framework as a means of viewing the transition process, the article identifies how one group of part-time undergraduates experienced the process of becoming an undergraduate. The results highlight the importance of offering a well-framed early learning experience for students, which enables them to learn the skills needed for early academic success and provides continued support as they progress in their own time towards recognition of themselves as undergraduates. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that transition is not time bound, and individual students will need individual approaches. This will require institutions to consider how the support they offer can be tailored to a student's specific needs.
    • Emotions and professional reflections in a post-war community: teachers’ perspectives from Kosovo

      Berisha Kida, Edona; Butler, Cathal; University of Pristine; University of Bedfordshire (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2020-11-05)
      Background: Teaching is more complex than dealing with the cognitive aspects of learning alone and is also influenced by affective states. Because of this, more research is needed into the role of teachers’ emotions in classroom interaction. Of special importance is research into reflective thinking and the extent to which it may be disturbed by the prior experience of trauma. Purpose: This study aimed to shed light on these issues by analysing reports of Kosovan teachers’ emotional arousal when speaking about and/or teaching topics related to war experiences, their beliefs about these experiences, their opinions about students’ reactions and their reports on professional reflective practices. Methods: Descriptive study. Data were collected by means of a structured questionnaire completed by 70 teachers. Results: Teachers reported strong emotions were triggered by discussion of topics linked to the war. Their beliefs influenced how they engaged with sensitive and emotionally charged topics, but they interpreted their professional behaviour using reflective and critical thinking. Conclusion: Both external and internal factors affect post-war teachers cognitively and emotionally. Further research is needed to identify the extent to which this impacts teachers’ ability to use critical reflection and critical emotional reflexivity in school-based practice.
    • Working with/in institutions: how policy enactment in widening participation is shaped through practitioners' experience

      Rainford, Jon; (Routledge, 2021-01-12)
      Widening participation in higher education is driven by policy which is then enacted by individual practitioners. Practitioners bring with them a wealth of personal and employment experiences which shape their interpretations and enactments. Drawing on sixteen in-depth semi structured interviews with practitioners across seven universities in England, a classification is developed in order to conceptualise their orientations to policy enactment. Whilst nationally focused, this study has international resonance especially in marketised HE systems where policies are similarly enacted. The model developed within the paper proposes that personal and professional experience can cause practitioners to orient towards the interests of the institution or the individuals they work with. This orientation can be in compliance with institutional policy or adopt a more transgressive stance. Through deeper theorisation of practitioner positions we can better understand how to ensure work in this area better serves the individuals which it is targeted at.
    • Widening the discourse on team-teaching in higher education

      Minett-Smith, Cathy; Davis, Carole L.; University of Bedfordshire; Solent University (Routledge, 2019-02-14)
      Team-teaching is arguably shifting from the realm of pedagogic choice to that of necessity in a complex and demanding Higher Education (HE) landscape. This research gives a voice to staff collaborating in team-teaching, considering their motivations and approach, to identify key challenges and opportunities. Results indicate that the changing landscape of HE in the UK is promoting innovative approaches to using existing team-teaching models rather than proposing new ones. The leadership dimension of the module leader role is highlighted, suggesting a need to explore and extend debates on developing academic leadership at all levels of academic employment. Consequently, the research contributes additional perspectives on existing work relating to academic leadership, the changing academic role, increasing workloads and professional teacher identity. The findings have implications for how staff are prepared and supported as practitioners in HE and the processes whereby we record and reward individuals contributions.
    • BIRDS-bridging the gap between information science, information retrieval and data science

      Frommholz, Ingo; Liu, Haiming; Melucci, Massimo; University of Bedfordshire; University of Padova (Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2020-07-30)
      The BIRDS workshop aimed to foster the cross-fertilization of Information Science (IS), Information Retrieval (IR) and Data Science (DS). Recognising the commonalities and differences between these communities, the proposed full-day workshop brought together experts and researchers in IS, IR and DS to discuss how they can learn from each other to provide more user-driven data and infor-mation exploration and retrieval solutions. Therefore, the papers aimed to convey ideas on how to utilise, for instance, IS concepts and theories in DS and IR or DS approaches to support users in data and information exploration.
    • IoT for 5G/B5G applications in smart homes, smart cities, wearables and connected cars

      Uddin, Hasna; Gibson, Marcia; Safdar, Ghazanfar Ali; Kalsoom, Tahera; Ramzan, Naeem; Ur-Rehman, Masood; Imran, Muhammad Ali; University of Bedfordshire; University of West of Scotland; University of Glasgow (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2019-10-07)
      Internet of things (IoT) is referred to as smart devices connected to the internet. A smart device is an electronic device, which may connect to other devices or are part of a network such as Wi-Fi. The increase of IoT devices has helped with advancing technology in many areas of society. Application of IoT in 5G/B5G devices has provided many benefits such as providing new ideas that can become projects for tech companies, generating big data (large volume of data which can be used to reveal trends, patterns and associations) and providing various ways of communicating. This has also had an impact on how companies improve their business with the use of advanced technology. However, the rapid growth of IoT has introduced a new platform for cybercriminals to attack. There has been published security measures on IoT to help deal with such risks and vulnerabilities. This survey paper will explore IoT in relation to smart homes, smart cities, wearables and connected cars. The benefits, risks and vulnerabilities will be discussed that comes along with using such devices connected to the internet.
    • Survey on security and privacy issues in cyber physical systems

      Nazarenko, Artem A.; Safdar, Ghazanfar Ali; Nova University of Lisbon; University of Bedfordshire (American Institute of Mathematical Sciences, 2019-04-16)
      The notion of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) is proposed by the National Scientific Foundation to describe a type of systems which combine hardware and software components and being the next step in development of embedded systems. CPS includes a wide range of research topics ranging from signal processing to data analysis. This paper contains a brief review of the basic infrastructure for CPS including smart objects and network aspects in relation to TCP/IP stack. As CPS reflect the processes of the physical environment onto the cyber space, virtualisation as an important tool for abstraction plays crucial role in CPS. In this context paper presents the challenges associated with mobility and vritualisation; accordingly three main types of virtualisation, namely network, devices and applications virtualisation are presented in the paper. These aspects are tightly coupled with security and safety issues. Therefore, different threats, attack types with corresponding subtypes and possible consequences are discussed as well as analysis of various approaches to cope with existing threats is introduced. In addition threat modelling approaches were also in scope of this work. Furthermore, needs and requirements for safety-critical CPS are reviewed. Thus the main efforts of this paper are directed on introducing various aspects of the CPS with regard to security and safety issues.
    • Security challenges in cyber systems

      Safdar, Ghazanfar Ali; Kalsoom, Tahera; Ramzan, Naeem; University of Bedfordshire; University of the West of Scotland (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2020-09-29)
      CPS (Cyber-Physical Systems) is proposed by the NSF (National Scientific Foundation) to describe a type of necessities which conglomerates hardware and software components and being the next step in development of embedded systems. CPS includes a wide range of research topics from signal processing to data analysis. This paper contains a brief review of the basic infrastructure for CPS including smart objects and network aspects in relation to TCP/IP stack. As CPS reflect the processes of the physical environment onto the cyber space, virtualisation as important tool for abstraction plays crucial role in CPS. In this context paper presents the challenges associated with mobility and vritualisation; accordingly, three main types of virtualisation, namely network, devices and applications virtualisation are presented in the paper. The main focus of the paper is made on security. Different threats, attack types and possible consequences are discussed as well as analysis of various approaches to cope with existing threats is introduced. Furthermore, needs and requirements for safety-critical CPS are reviewed.
    • Safeguarding adults and COVID-19: a sector-led improvement response

      Cooper, Adi; University of Bedfordshire (Emerald Group Holdings Ltd., 2020-10-21)
      Purpose: This study aims to describe the sector-led response to the COVID-19 pandemic and national lockdown in terms of safeguarding adults. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses a case study method to examine a sector-led improvement response to COVID-19 and safeguarding adults. Findings: The study describes how safeguarding issues and concerns were identified and brought together, and then responded to. It reviews this initiative in the context of crisis intervention theory and discusses the achievements of this initiative regarding COVID-19 and safeguarding adults during the period April–July 2020. Originality/value: The study describes a unique joint initiative between the Local Government Association and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, which worked with the Networks of Chairs of Safeguarding Adults Boards, Safeguarding Adults Boards’ managers and Principal Social Workers. This initiative developed resources and shared information and good practice to support a response in unprecedented circumstances.
    • Ethnic differences in body fat deposition and liver fat content in two UK-based cohorts

      Alenaini, Wareed; Parkinson, James R.; McCarthy, John; Goldstone, Anthony P.; Wilman, Henry R.; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Bell, Jimmy D.; Thomas, E. Louise; University of Westminster; et al. (Wiley, 2020-09-16)
      Objective: Differences in the content and distribution of body fat and ectopic lipids may be responsible for ethnic variations in metabolic disease susceptibility. The aim of this study was to examine the ethnic distribution of body fat in two separate UK-based populations. Methods: Anthropometry and body composition were assessed in two separate UK cohorts: the Hammersmith cohort and the UK Biobank, both comprising individuals of South Asian descent (SA), individuals of Afro-Caribbean descent (AC), and individuals of European descent (EUR). Regional adipose tissue stores and liver fat were measured by magnetic resonance techniques. Results: The Hammersmith cohort (n = 747) had a mean (SD) age of 41.1 (14.5) years (EUR: 374 men, 240 women; SA: 68 men, 22 women; AC: 14 men, 29 women), and the UK Biobank (n = 9,533) had a mean (SD) age of 55.5 (7.5) years (EUR: 4,483 men, 4,873 women; SA: 80 men, 43 women, AC: 31 men, 25 women). Following adjustment for age and BMI, no significant differences in visceral adipose tissue or liver fat were observed between SA and EUR individuals in the either cohort. Conclusions: Our data, consistent across two independent UK-based cohorts, present a limited number of ethnic differences in the distribution of body fat depots associated with metabolic disease. These results suggest that the ethnic variation in susceptibility to features of the metabolic syndrome may not arise from differences in body fat.
    • The vital role of health psychology in the response to COVID-19

      Arden, Madelynne A.; Byrne-Davis, Lucie; Chater, Angel M.; Hart, Jo; McBride, Emily; Chilcot, Joseph (John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2020-10-27)
      We had a huge response to our editorial and call for submissions of health psychology research related to the coronavirus pandemic (Arden & Chilcot, 2020). A total of 177 brief reports and papers have been submitted to BJHP since that call in March 2020. It has been a mammoth task for our associate editors, reviewers, and production team at Wiley to manage these papers (alongside non‐COVID submissions) in a shortened time frame, and the editors, Prof Arden and Dr Chilcot, would like to extend our sincere thanks to all who contributed their time and energies to this endeavour at what was a difficult time for everyone. This issue of BJHP includes a special section entitled COVID‐19: Health Psychology Theory and Research which includes the papers and brief reports on this topic accepted for publication to date.
    • Health behaviour change considerations for weight loss and type 2 diabetes: nutrition, physical activity and sedentary behaviour

      Chater, Angel M.; Smith, Lindsey Rachel; Ferrandino, Louise; Wyld, Kevin; Bailey, Daniel Paul (John Wiley and Sons Ltd, 2020-11-30)
      Good nutrition, regular physical activity and low levels of sedentary behaviour are important in the prevention, management and treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Self-management requires individuals to have the capability to enact, opportunity to enable and motivation to perform relevant health behaviours. These behaviours, and the bio-psycho-social drivers of them, should be considered when working in the area of T2DM.