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dc.contributor.authorHand, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Ashley
dc.contributor.authorFilik, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorPitchford, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorRobus, Christopher M.
dc.contributor.illustrator
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-21T10:28:24Z
dc.date.available2022-04-12T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2022-04-21T10:28:24Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-12
dc.identifier.citationHand CJ, Kennedy A, Filik R, Pitchford M, Robus CM (2022) 'Emoji identification and emoji effects on sentence emotionality in ASD-diagnosed adults and neurotypical controls', Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, (), pp.-.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0162-3257
dc.identifier.pmid35415776
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10803-022-05557-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/625370
dc.description.abstractWe investigated ASD-diagnosed adults' and neurotypical (NT) controls' processing of emoji and emoji influence on the emotionality of otherwise-neutral sentences. Study 1 participants categorised emoji representing the six basic emotions using a fixed-set of emotional adjectives. Results showed that ASD-diagnosed participants' classifications of fearful, sad, and surprised emoji were more diverse and less 'typical' than NT controls' responses. Study 2 participants read emotionally-neutral sentences; half paired with sentence-final happy emoji, half with sad emoji. Participants rated sentence + emoji stimuli for emotional valence. ASD-diagnosed and NT participants rated sentences + happy emoji as equally-positive, however, ASD-diagnosed participants rated sentences + sad emoji as more-negative than NT participants. We must acknowledge differential perceptions and effects of emoji, and emoji-text inter-relationships, when working with neurodiverse stakeholders.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors did not receive any funding to complete this research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10803-022-05557-4en_US
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectautism spectrum disordersen_US
dc.subjectautismen_US
dc.subjectautism spectrumen_US
dc.subjectdouble empathyen_US
dc.subjectemojien_US
dc.subjectemotionen_US
dc.subjectsocial information processingen_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::C860 Neuropsychologyen_US
dc.titleEmoji identification and emoji effects on sentence emotionality in ASD-diagnosed adults and neurotypical controlsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1573-3432
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Glasgowen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGlasgow Caledonian Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_US
dc.contributor.departmentRegents University Londonen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disordersen_US
dc.date.updated2022-04-21T10:23:20Z
dc.description.notegold open access


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