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dc.contributor.authorRato, Nuno Dias
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Joanna C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-16T09:59:19Z
dc.date.available2021-10-11T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2021-11-16T09:59:19Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-11
dc.identifier.citationRato ND, Richards J (2021) 'Left ventricular remodeling in rugby is a physiological adaptation to exercise: a pilot study conducted with high-level athletes', Sport Sciences for Health, 18, pp.367-374.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1824-7490
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11332-021-00815-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/625231
dc.description.abstractPurpose Literature examining left ventricular (LV) structural adaptations to combined strength and endurance training is inconsistent. Rugby is a sport that combines these two exercise modalities, both during training and match play. This study aimed to explore differences in LV structure between high-level rugby players and untrained controls. Body composition analysis was performed to determine the most appropriate indexing variable for LV mass (LVM) and understand if increases in LV represent either a training-related physiological adaptation or reflect the groups’ anthropometric differences. Methods A cross-sectional design compared 10 rugby players and 10 untrained age-matched, male controls. Body composition was obtained by bioelectrical impedance. M-mode echocardiographic imaging was performed on the LV from the parasternal long axis view. Results Significantly greater end-diastolic interventricular septum, LV internal diameter, posterior wall thickness, LVM and LVM/fat-free mass (FFM) (p < 0.05) were found in rugby players compared to age-matched controls. Moreover, Pearson’s correlation tests revealed FFM to be the body composition variable with the strongest correlation to LVM (r = 0.775, p < 0.001). Conclusion The differences in LV structure between groups suggest that the combined endurance and strength training that rugby athletes are subjected to, induce a process of concentric and eccentric enlargement of the LV structure. Furthermore, the association found with FFM, suggests it to be the most appropriate body scaling variable to index to LVM and, thus, should be considered when describing increases in LVM. The present research suggests that increased LVM in the athletes group represents true physiological adaptations to training.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11332-021-00815-xen_US
dc.rights
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectleft ventricleen_US
dc.subjectrugbyen_US
dc.subjectexerciseen_US
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen_US
dc.titleLeft ventricular remodeling in rugby is a physiological adaptation to exercise: a pilot study conducted with high-level athletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1825-1234
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Maiaen_US
dc.identifier.journalSport Sciences for Healthen_US
dc.date.updated2021-11-16T09:54:20Z
dc.description.notegold oa via Springer Compact


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