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dc.contributor.authorBryce, Ros
dc.contributor.authorIrvine, Katherin N.
dc.contributor.authorChurch, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorFish, Rob
dc.contributor.authorRanger, Sue
dc.contributor.authorKenter, Jasper O.
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-25T12:29:11Z
dc.date.available2021-10-25T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2021-10-25T12:29:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-05
dc.identifier.citationBryce R, Irvine KN, Church A, Fish R, Ranger S, Kenter JO (2016) 'Subjective well-being indicators for large-scale assessment of cultural ecosystem services', Ecosystem Services, 21 (Part B), pp.258-269.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2212-0416
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.07.015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/625132
dc.description.abstractThe substantial importance of cultural benefits as a source of human well-being is increasingly recognised in society-environment interactions. The integration of cultural ecosystem services (CES) into the ecosystem services framework remains a challenge due to the difficulties associated with defining, articulating and measuring CES. We operationalise a novel framework developed by the UK National Ecosystem Assessment that identifies CES as the interactions between environmental spaces (i.e. physical localities or landscapes), and the activities that occur there. We evaluate the benefits of the CES provided by 151 UK marine sites to recreational sea anglers and divers, using subjective well-being indicators. Factor analysis of an online questionnaire with 1220 participants revealed multiple CES benefits that contribute to human wellbeing e.g. including ‘engagement with nature’, ‘place identity’ and ‘therapeutic value’. In addition to regional differences, we also found that biophysical attributes of sites, such as the presence of charismatic species and species diversity, were positively associated with provision of CES benefits. The study provides evidence that could be used to inform designation of protected areas. The indicators used in the study may also be adapted for use across a range of marine and terrestrial spaces for improved integration of CES in environmental decision-making.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUK Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), the Welsh Government, the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC); additional funding was received from the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation through the Marine Conservation Society. J.O. Kenter was also supported by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant agreement no. 315925 and K.N. Irvine by the Scottish Government Rural and Economic Sciences and Analytical Service (RESAS) Division.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212041616301978en_US
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcultural ecosystem servicesen_US
dc.subjectcultural benefitsen_US
dc.subjectsubjective well-being indicatorsen_US
dc.subjectmarine protected areasen_US
dc.subjectrecreationen_US
dc.subjectnon-monetary valuationen_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::F810 Environmental Geographyen_US
dc.titleSubjective well-being indicators for large-scale assessment of cultural ecosystem servicesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of the Highlands and Islandsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentJames Hutton Instituteen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Brightonen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Kenten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMarine Conservation Societyen_US
dc.identifier.journalEcosystem Servicesen_US
dc.date.updated2021-10-25T12:25:14Z
dc.description.note© 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/). This research was funded through the UK National Ecosystem Assessment Follow-On (Work Package 6: Shared, Plural and Cultural Values) funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), the Welsh Government, the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC); additional funding was received from the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation through the Marine Conservation Society. J.O. Kenter was also supported by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant agreement no. 315925 and K.N. Irvine by the Scottish Government Rural and Economic Sciences and Analytical Service (RESAS) Division.


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