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dc.contributor.authorFernandes, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Chris
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorChavda, Shyam
dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Sean J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-22T08:56:33Z
dc.date.available2021-06-22T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2021-06-22T08:56:33Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-28
dc.identifier.citationFernandes R, Bishop C, Turner AN, Chavda S, Maloney SJ (2020) 'Train the engine or the brakes? influence of momentum on the change of direction deficit', International journal of sports physiology and performance, 16 (1), pp.90-96.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid33120363
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/ijspp.2019-1007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/625026
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Currently, it is unclear which physical characteristics may underpin the change of direction deficit (COD-D). This investigation sought to determine if momentum, speed-, and jump-based measures may explain variance in COD-D. METHODS: Seventeen males from a professional soccer academy (age, 16.76 [0.75] y; height, 1.80 [0.06] m; body mass, 72.38 [9.57] kg) performed 505 tests on both legs, a 40-m sprint, and single-leg countermovement and drop jumps. RESULTS: The regression analyses did not reveal any significant predictors for COD-D on either leg. "Large" relationships were reported between the COD-D and 505 time on both limbs (r = .65 to .69; P < .01), but COD-D was not associated with linear momentum, speed-, or jump-based performances. When the cohort was median split by COD-D, the effect sizes suggested that the subgroup with the smaller COD-D was 5% faster in the 505 test (d = -1.24; P < .001) but 4% slower over 0-10 m (d = 0.79; P = .33) and carried 11% less momentum (d = -0.81; P = .17). CONCLUSION: Individual variance in COD-D may not be explained by speed- and jump-based performance measures within academy soccer players. However, when grouping athletes by COD-D, faster athletes with greater momentum are likely to display a larger COD-D. It may, therefore, be prudent to recommend more eccentric-biased or technically focused COD training in such athletes and for coaches to view the COD action as a specific skill that may not be represented by performance time in a COD test.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHuman Kineticsen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/ijspp/16/1/article-p90.xmlen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectaccelerationen_US
dc.subjectagilityen_US
dc.subjectspeeden_US
dc.subjectturningen_US
dc.subjectmultidirectionalen_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::C600 Sports Scienceen_US
dc.titleTrain the engine or the brakes? influence of momentum on the change of direction deficiten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1555-0273
dc.contributor.departmentMiddlesex Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of sports physiology and performanceen_US
dc.date.updated2021-06-22T08:52:14Z
dc.description.notealso at https://eprints.mdx.ac.uk/29691/ https://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/12249 zero embargo


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