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dc.contributor.authorCook, Erica Jane
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Faye
dc.contributor.authorAli, Nasreen
dc.contributor.authorPenn-Jones, Catrin Pedder
dc.contributor.authorOchieng, Bertha
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurch
dc.contributor.illustrator
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-16T11:50:06Z
dc.date.available2021-04-16T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2021-04-16T11:50:06Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-06
dc.identifier.citationCook EJ, Powell F, Ali N, Penn-Jones C, Ochieng B, Randhawa G (2021) 'Improving support for breastfeeding mothers: a qualitative study on the experiences of breastfeeding among mothers who reside in a deprived and culturally diverse community', International Journal for Equity in Health, 20 (1)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1475-9276
dc.identifier.pmid33823848
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12939-021-01419-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/624904
dc.description.abstractThe United Kingdom has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in Europe, with the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding shown to be closely related to the mothers' age, ethnicity and social class. Whilst the barriers that influence a woman's decision to breastfeed are well documented, less is known how these barriers vary by the UK's diverse population. As such, this study aimed to explore mothers' experiences of breastfeeding and accessing breastfeeding services offered locally amongst a deprived and culturally diverse community. A qualitative interpretive study comprising of 63 mothers (white British n = 8, Pakistani n = 13, Bangladeshi n = 10, black African n = 15 and Polish n = 17) who took part in single-sex focus groups, conducted in local community centres across the most deprived and ethnically diverse wards in Luton, UK. The focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically using Framework Analysis. The most common barriers to breastfeeding irrespective of ethnicity were perceptions surrounding pain and lack of milk. Confidence and motivation were found to be crucial facilitators of breastfeeding; whereby mothers felt that interventions should seek to reassure and support mothers not only during the early stages but throughout the breastfeeding journey. Mothers particularly valued the practical support provided by health care professions particularly surrounding positioning and attachment techniques. However, many mothers felt that the support from health care professionals was not always followed through. The findings presented inform important recommendations for the design and implementation of future programs and interventions targeted at reducing breastfeeding inequalities. Interventions should focus on providing mothers practical support and reassurance not only during the early stages but throughout their breastfeeding journey. The findings also highlight the need for tailoring services to support diverse communities which acknowledge different traditional and familial practices.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMCen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://equityhealthj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12939-021-01419-0en_US
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbreastfeedingen_US
dc.subjectdeprivationen_US
dc.subjectinfant formula feedingen_US
dc.subjectminority ethnic groupsen_US
dc.subjectqualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::L431 Health Policyen_US
dc.titleImproving support for breastfeeding mothers: a qualitative study on the experiences of breastfeeding among mothers who reside in a deprived and culturally diverse communityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1475-9276
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDe Montfort Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal for Equity in Healthen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8025360
dc.date.updated2021-04-16T11:45:25Z
dc.description.notegold oa


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