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dc.contributor.authorShort, Emma
dc.contributor.authorStanley, Tyne
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Mick
dc.contributor.authorScott, Graham G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-27T12:25:14Z
dc.date.available2015-01-13T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2020-11-27T12:25:14Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-13
dc.identifier.citationShort E, Stanley T, Baldwin M, Scott GG (2015) 'Behaving badly online: establishing norms of unacceptable behaviours, media and communication', Studies in media and communication, 3 (1)en_US
dc.identifier.issn2325-8071
dc.identifier.doi10.11114/smc.v3i1.576
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/624688
dc.description.abstractVictims of online abuse suffer measurable negative effects equivalent to survivors of traumas such as bombings and sexual assaults but it has been suggested that the general population view such online behaviour as acceptable, with victims consequently receiving little support. This is an issue of increasing import as the number and accessibility of online communication apps, and their incorporation into our everyday lives, increases the opportunity for Deviant Online Behaviours (DOBs) to be perpetrated. In order to better understand individuals’ attitudes to specific DOBs 118 psychology undergraduate students rated 11 examples of DOBs on a scale of severity. Individual difference measures of online cognitions and interpersonal sensitivity were also collected. A factor analysis revealed 3 emerging online behaviour types: use of false information (theft of identity, tricking others), unsolicited behaviour (unsolicited e-mailing/messaging), and persistent communication (frequent contact and use of multiple identities). ‘Persistent communication’ was viewed as more unacceptable than ‘unsolicited behaviour’ and ‘false information’, though all contained behaviours which have been demonstrated to cause severe harm to victims. These findings attempt to demonstrate how individuals categorise deviant online behaviours in terms of severity and individual differences that may be associated with these perceptions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRed Fameen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://redfame.com/journal/index.php/smc/article/view/576/800en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectonline behaviouren_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::G440 Human-computer Interactionen_US
dc.titleBehaving badly online: establishing norms of unacceptable behaviours, media and communicationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2325-808X
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of the West of Scotlanden_US
dc.identifier.journalStudies in media and communicationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-11-27T12:19:43Z
dc.description.noteopen access with cc licence


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International