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dc.contributor.authorEnow, Linda
dc.contributor.authorGoodwyn, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-14T08:29:49Z
dc.date.available2020-10-14T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2020-10-14T08:29:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-08
dc.identifier.citationEnow L, Goodwyn A (2018) 'The invisible plan: how English teachers develop their expertise and the special place of adapting the skills of lesson planning', English in Education, 52 (2), pp.120-134.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0425-0494
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/04250494.2018.1438119
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/624551
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyses how English teachers learn to become expert designers of learning and why sharing that expertise is increasingly vital. Its conceptual framework is the widely recognised, empirically tested, five-stage developmental Dreyfus model of skill acquisition, exemplifying the development of teacher expertise, constituted by the “milestone” [m] and “transitory” [t] phases connecting with the five stages of: Novice [m], Advanced Beginner [t], Competent [m], Proficient [t] and Expert [m]. Teacher planning is analysed as one key tacit or non-tangible component of developing expertise. Focusing specifically on English teachers as key participants in this pioneer teacher cognition study, the defining characteristics of milestone stages of expertise development are explored with specific attention to the remarkably under-researched area of planning. We introduce three new categories, defining modes of planning: (i) visible practical planning, (ii) external reflective planning and (iii) internal reflective planning, demonstrating their role in teacher development through the Dreyfus five stages. English is a subject which suffers from frequent disruptive changes to curriculum and assessment: new learning designs are constantly demanded, making planning an ongoing challenge. The implications for practice include the importance of an explicit understanding of how teachers’ planning moves through the three phases from the very “visible” novice phase to the internal relatively “automatic” competent teacher and finally the seemingly “invisible” expert phase. Further research is needed to explore how English teachers can share planning expertise between the three phases to improve teachers’ skills and student learning.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francis Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/04250494.2018.1438119en_US
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectteacher cognitionen_US
dc.subjectEnglish teachingen_US
dc.subjecttacit dimensionen_US
dc.subjectexpertise developmenten_US
dc.subjectteacher planningen_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::X330 Academic studies in Secondary Educationen_US
dc.titleThe invisible plan: how English teachers develop their expertise and the special place of adapting the skills of lesson planningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNewman Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_US
dc.identifier.journalEnglish in Educationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-10-14T08:19:07Z
dc.description.notefull text from https://newman.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/17216/1/NU0055.pdf


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