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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Max Granville
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-21T10:38:16Z
dc.date.available2020-09-21T10:38:16Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-16
dc.identifier.citationSmith, M.G. (2020) 'Collaborative Teaching and Learning of Primary School Physical Education in England: A Critical Examination of the Role and Impact of External Providers'. MA by Research thesis. University of Bedfordshire.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/624519
dc.description"A thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MA by Research".en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Reporting on the use of the Primary PE and Sport Premium in schools is often limited to ‘official’ reports produced for and by the government. The use of public funds to improve the opportunities for pupils in PE and School Sport is not a new concept, previously receiving funding under ‘PESSCL’ and ‘PESSYP’ two major PESS strategies introduced between 2003-2010. The Primary PE and Sport Premium was introduced into primary schools in 2013 and saw a doubling of this money in 2017 as a beneficiary of the UK Government imposed ‘Sugar Tax’. What is limited in this field however is research on ‘how’ schools use the money and the decision-making process of headteachers and schools when it comes to spending/investing this ring-fenced allocation of funding. Purpose: The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of ‘how’ schools spend, or invest, the funding they receive via the Primary PE and Sport Premium and to what extend they are able to satisfy the conditions of this grant. Research Setting: This study was undertaken across three primary schools in the South of England. Involving school staff that included the headteacher, the lead for PE and any external providers that the school used in the delivery of PESS. Methods: Data was collected through semi-structured interviews supplemented with observations, documentary analysis and field diaries. Data was coded and analysed by Grounded Theory. Findings: Coaches had good skill knowledge but lack critical pedagogical understanding while teachers lack confidence to teach PE. Head teachers should be accountable for PE but did not have the time or knowledge to effectively manage the Primary PE and Sport Premium. There were issues with the use of the funding, and outside of the permitted use as per the Primary PE and Sport Premium Guidelines. Conclusion: Schools were superficially using the funding to increase physical activity as opposed to Physical Education. Schools were spending the money on a service rather than investing their money for the purpose of sustainability.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPEen_US
dc.subjectprimaryen_US
dc.subjectsporten_US
dc.subjectpremiumen_US
dc.subjectoutsourcingen_US
dc.subjectsustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectcoachesen_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::X320 Academic studies in Primary Educationen_US
dc.subjectphysical educationen_US
dc.titleCollaborative teaching and learning of primary school physical education in England: a critical examination of the role and impact of external providersen_US
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-21T10:38:17Z


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