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dc.contributor.authorSochos, Antigonos
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-17T12:06:48Z
dc.date.available2020-08-17T12:06:48Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-31
dc.identifier.citationSochos A (2015) 'Incoherence in the Iraq War narrative and the concept of collective attachment', The Journal of psychohistory, 42 (4), pp.262-279.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0145-3378
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/624430
dc.description.abstractAs a major function of ideological and institutional frameworks is to provide security to the social group, by constructing ideologies and socio-political institutions, social groups also construct their objects of collective attachment. When social debates are conducted openly and freely, they are informed by secure collective attachment representations leading to effective and group-protecting action. When they are conducted in the context of social domination they are informed by insecure collective attachment representations, leading to ineffective and group-compromising action. The decision to invade Iraq in 2003 seems to have been informed by insecure collective attachment representations defining an incoherent social narrative and an ineffective protective strategy.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Psychohistoryen_US
dc.subjectIraq Waren_US
dc.titleIncoherence in the Iraq War narrative and the concept of collective attachmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of psychohistoryen_US
dc.date.updated2020-08-17T12:05:58Z
dc.description.noteprint only


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