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dc.contributor.authorBrown, T.en
dc.contributor.authorWassif, Hodaen
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-21T09:42:52Z
dc.date.available2020-02-21T09:42:52Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-10
dc.identifier.citationBrown T, Wassif HS (2017) 'Understanding continuous professional development participation and choice of mid-career general dental practitioners', European Journal of Dental Education, 21 (1), pp.46-51.en
dc.identifier.issn1396-5883
dc.identifier.pmid26663558
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eje.12177
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623850
dc.description.abstractParticipating in continuing professional development (CPD) activities is a requirement for dental practitioners to keep their skills and knowledge up to date. Understanding the ways dental practitioners engage with professional development and the impact on practice is not fully known (Eaton et al. 2011, http://www.gdc-uk.org/Aboutus/policy/Documents/Impact Of CPD In Dentistry.pdf). The aim of this study was to gain insights into the ways that dentists reflect on their professional development and what may be influencing their choices. Empirical qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviewing of five mid-career dentists. Using grounded theory, the data were analysed for themes about CPD choice and participation. Three themes were identified as influences to dentists' choices of CPD with pragmatic considerations of how new learning could benefit their patients and their practices. Dental practitioners were influenced by the requirements of external regulatory bodies which they did not consider to necessarily improve practice. Dentists working in primary care in the UK are undertaking CPD which is influenced by the pragmatic requirements of running a small business and to meet regulatory requirements. In this sample, dentists are not critically reflecting on their education needs when choosing their CPD activity. Protected learning time and organisational feedback and support are recommended as a way to promote more meaningful reflection on learning and to improve professional development. OBJECTIVE METHOD RESULTS CONCLUSION
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/eje.12177en
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
dc.subjectprofessional developmenten
dc.subjectcontinuous professional developmenten
dc.subjectCPDen
dc.subjectdental educationen
dc.subjectdental practitionersen
dc.subjectdentistryen
dc.titleUnderstanding continuous professional development participation and choice of mid-career general dental practitionersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0579
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Education Yorkshire and Humberen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Dental Educationen
dc.date.updated2020-02-21T09:40:02Z
html.description.abstractParticipating in continuing professional development (CPD) activities is a requirement for dental practitioners to keep their skills and knowledge up to date. Understanding the ways dental practitioners engage with professional development and the impact on practice is not fully known (Eaton et al. 2011, http://www.gdc-uk.org/Aboutus/policy/Documents/Impact Of CPD In Dentistry.pdf). The aim of this study was to gain insights into the ways that dentists reflect on their professional development and what may be influencing their choices. Empirical qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviewing of five mid-career dentists. Using grounded theory, the data were analysed for themes about CPD choice and participation. Three themes were identified as influences to dentists' choices of CPD with pragmatic considerations of how new learning could benefit their patients and their practices. Dental practitioners were influenced by the requirements of external regulatory bodies which they did not consider to necessarily improve practice. Dentists working in primary care in the UK are undertaking CPD which is influenced by the pragmatic requirements of running a small business and to meet regulatory requirements. In this sample, dentists are not critically reflecting on their education needs when choosing their CPD activity. Protected learning time and organisational feedback and support are recommended as a way to promote more meaningful reflection on learning and to improve professional development. OBJECTIVE METHOD RESULTS CONCLUSION


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