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dc.contributor.authorNethercott, Kathrynen
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-10T14:21:15Z
dc.date.available2020-02-10T14:21:15Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-03
dc.identifier.citationNethercott K (2020) 'Assessment or referral tool: the unintended consequences of a dual purpose common assessment framework form', Journal of Interprofessional Care, 35 (1), pp.1-9.en
dc.identifier.issn1356-1820
dc.identifier.pmid32011189
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13561820.2019.1705772
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623837
dc.description.abstractThe Common Assessment Framework (CAF) was designed to facilitate early intervention through multi-agency working and the active involvement of families. The underlying principle was to move away from a risk-focused, needs-led or service-led culture to assess need and match needs to identified services. It was anticipated that services and assessments would become more evidence-based, and a common language between professionals and agencies would evolve. Taking a social constructionist approach this study explored professionals’ experiences of the use of the Common Assessment Framework form. Forty-one professionals from four different local authorities and a variety of agencies took part in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed utilizing thematic analysis. Findings suggest the unintended consequences of the use of the CAF were influenced by local authority policy. As the local authorities adopted the policy of utilizing the CAF as a referral mechanism, rather than to assess needs, profes-sionals unintentionally perceived the CAF form as a referral tool, to refer families to existing service provision. Further to this, professionals referred to the CAF form itself, as a ‘means to an end’, implying that this was a step that had to be overcome in order to access services.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13561820.2019.1705772en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectmulti-agency workingen
dc.subjectassessmenten
dc.subjectCommon Assessment Frameworken
dc.subjectreferralen
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken
dc.titleAssessment or referral tool: the unintended consequences of a dual purpose common assessment framework formen
dc.title.alternativeAssessment or referral toolen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Interprofessional Careen
dc.date.updated2020-02-10T14:14:26Z
dc.description.notePublisher does not permit archiving of final published version - do you have a previous version we could use? eg after review but before publisher formatting applied. RVO 6/2/20 File supplied 10/2/20
html.description.abstractThe Common Assessment Framework (CAF) was designed to facilitate early intervention through multi-agency working and the active involvement of families. The underlying principle was to move away from a risk-focused, needs-led or service-led culture to assess need and match needs to identified services. It was anticipated that services and assessments would become more evidence-based, and a common language between professionals and agencies would evolve. Taking a social constructionist approach this study explored professionals’ experiences of the use of the Common Assessment Framework form. Forty-one professionals from four different local authorities and a variety of agencies took part in semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed utilizing thematic analysis. Findings suggest the unintended consequences of the use of the CAF were influenced by local authority policy. As the local authorities adopted the policy of utilizing the CAF as a referral mechanism, rather than to assess needs, profes-sionals unintentionally perceived the CAF form as a referral tool, to refer families to existing service provision. Further to this, professionals referred to the CAF form itself, as a ‘means to an end’, implying that this was a step that had to be overcome in order to access services.


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