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dc.contributor.authorClements, Andrew Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-14T10:28:34Z
dc.date.available2020-01-14T10:28:34Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-08
dc.identifier.citationClements AJ (2019) 'What motivational processes underpin student engagement with employability? : a critical review', in Diver A (ed(s).). Employability via Higher Education: Sustainability as Scholarship, Springer pp.67-81.en
dc.identifier.isbn9783030263416
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623783
dc.description.abstractThere are concerns that students fail to engage with employability soon enough in their studies, and do not seek the best available support.  This chapter explores the role that motivation plays in students’ career management behaviours, notably career exploration, decision-making, and job search.  The literature highlights the crucial role played by self-efficacy, i.e. belief in one’s ability to perform a task, which is informed by personal experience and feedback.  Time spent on career exploration (i.e. reflecting on one’s own qualities and exploring opportunities) is associated with greater confidence in making career decisions.  Job search behaviours, such as effort, is associated with better career outcomes.  However, there is a gap in the literature regarding how earlier exploration and decision activities inform the job search.  This chapter identifies opportunities for addressing this gap, and the potential value of exploring student job search strategies.  Yet while attention to motivation may inform how we work with individual students, it remains necessary to consider environmental conditions in the labour market.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030263416en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectemployabilityen
dc.subjectmotivationen
dc.subjectcareer behavioursen
dc.subjectL550 Careers Guidanceen
dc.titleWhat motivational processes underpin student engagement with employability? : a critical reviewen
dc.title.alternativeEmployability via Higher Education: Sustainability as Scholarshipen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.date.updated2020-01-14T10:10:47Z
dc.description.notehttps://www.springer.com/gp/open-access/publication-policies/self-archiving-policy - archiving permitted with 24m embargo
html.description.abstractThere are concerns that students fail to engage with employability soon enough in their studies, and do not seek the best available support.  This chapter explores the role that motivation plays in students’ career management behaviours, notably career exploration, decision-making, and job search.  The literature highlights the crucial role played by self-efficacy, i.e. belief in one’s ability to perform a task, which is informed by personal experience and feedback.  Time spent on career exploration (i.e. reflecting on one’s own qualities and exploring opportunities) is associated with greater confidence in making career decisions.  Job search behaviours, such as effort, is associated with better career outcomes.  However, there is a gap in the literature regarding how earlier exploration and decision activities inform the job search.  This chapter identifies opportunities for addressing this gap, and the potential value of exploring student job search strategies.  Yet while attention to motivation may inform how we work with individual students, it remains necessary to consider environmental conditions in the labour market.


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