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dc.contributor.authorAune, Anne A.G.
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Chris
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorPapadopoulos, Kostas
dc.contributor.authorBudd, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Mark
dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Sean J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-10T14:13:39Z
dc.date.available2020-01-10T14:13:39Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-12T00:00:00Z
dc.identifier.citationAune A, Bishop C, Turner A, Papadopoulos K, Budd S, Richardson M, Maloney S (2019) 'Acute and chronic effects of foam rolling vs eccentric exercise on ROM and force output of the plantar flexors', Journal of Sports Sciences, 37 (2), pp.138-145.
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414
dc.identifier.pmid29893193
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640414.2018.1486000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623769
dc.description.abstractFoam rolling and eccentric exercise interventions have been demonstrated to improve range of motion (ROM). However, these two modalities have not been directly compared. Twenty-three academy soccer players (age: 18 ± 1; height: 1.74 ± 0.08 m; body mass: 69.3 ± 7.5 kg) were randomly allocated to either a foam rolling (FR) or eccentric exercise intervention designed to improve dorsiflexion ROM. Participants performed the intervention daily for a duration of four weeks. Measurements of dorsiflexion ROM, isometric plantar flexion torque and drop jump reactive strength index were taken at baseline (pre-intervention) and at three subsequent time-points (30-min post, 24-hours post and 4-weeks post). A significant time x group interaction effect was observed for dorsiflexion (P = 0.036), but not for torque or reactive strength index. For dorsiflexion, there was a significant increase in both acute (30-min; P < 0.001) and chronic (4-week; P < 0.001) ROM for the eccentric group, whilst FR exhibited only an acute improvement (P < 0.001). Eccentric training would appear a more efficacious modality than foam rolling for improving dorsiflexion ROM in elite academy soccer players.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2018.1486000
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectrange of motionen
dc.subjectself-myofascial releaseen
dc.subjectreactive strength indexen
dc.subjectpoweren
dc.subjectankleen
dc.subjectflexibilityen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.titleAcute and chronic effects of foam rolling vs eccentric exercise on ROM and force output of the plantar flexors
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciences
dc.date.updated2020-01-10T14:04:38Z
dc.description.notetext from Middlesex
html.description.abstractFoam rolling and eccentric exercise interventions have been demonstrated to improve range of motion (ROM). However, these two modalities have not been directly compared. Twenty-three academy soccer players (age: 18 ± 1; height: 1.74 ± 0.08 m; body mass: 69.3 ± 7.5 kg) were randomly allocated to either a foam rolling (FR) or eccentric exercise intervention designed to improve dorsiflexion ROM. Participants performed the intervention daily for a duration of four weeks. Measurements of dorsiflexion ROM, isometric plantar flexion torque and drop jump reactive strength index were taken at baseline (pre-intervention) and at three subsequent time-points (30-min post, 24-hours post and 4-weeks post). A significant time x group interaction effect was observed for dorsiflexion (P = 0.036), but not for torque or reactive strength index. For dorsiflexion, there was a significant increase in both acute (30-min; P < 0.001) and chronic (4-week; P < 0.001) ROM for the eccentric group, whilst FR exhibited only an acute improvement (P < 0.001). Eccentric training would appear a more efficacious modality than foam rolling for improving dorsiflexion ROM in elite academy soccer players.


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