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dc.contributor.authorWeedon, Alexisen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-09T09:57:22Z
dc.date.available2020-01-09T09:57:22Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-16
dc.identifier.citationWeedon A (2020) 'The uses of quantification', in Eliot S, Rose J (ed(s).). A Companion to the History fo the Book, 2nd edn, Chichester: Wiley Blackwell pp.31-50.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781119018179
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/9781119018193.ch3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623748
dc.description.abstractRevised and updated chapter with new material for the second edition of A Companion to the History fo the Book. Because text production – in the past and now – frequently aimed at multiplying and spreading its product as much as possible, and because those texts commonly became subject to markets and market forces, historical records of books and the book trade sometimes take the form of lists of quantities. Particularly since the invention of printing, we sometimes have information about the fee paid to an author, cost of paper, cost of composition, print runs, cost and rate of binding, costs of advertizing and distribution, sales figures, library acquisitions and catalogues of private collections of readers. The information is usually patchy, the way it was recorded varied a great deal, and much more has been lost than survives but, even so, the data available is rich enough and important enough to be treated seriously. This is where the quantitative history of the book, or bibliometrics, comes in. It doesn’t answer all the questions, and often its answers need careful interpretation, but it does give us access to parts of book history that would otherwise be wholly inaccessible.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781119018193.ch3en
dc.subjecthistory of the booken
dc.subjectbibliometricsen
dc.subjectquantitative researchen
dc.subjectpublishingen
dc.subjectP400 Publishingen
dc.titleThe uses of quantificationen
dc.title.alternativeA Companion to the History fo the Booken
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.date.updated2020-01-09T09:52:47Z
html.description.abstractRevised and updated chapter with new material for the second edition of A Companion to the History fo the Book. Because text production – in the past and now – frequently aimed at multiplying and spreading its product as much as possible, and because those texts commonly became subject to markets and market forces, historical records of books and the book trade sometimes take the form of lists of quantities. Particularly since the invention of printing, we sometimes have information about the fee paid to an author, cost of paper, cost of composition, print runs, cost and rate of binding, costs of advertizing and distribution, sales figures, library acquisitions and catalogues of private collections of readers. The information is usually patchy, the way it was recorded varied a great deal, and much more has been lost than survives but, even so, the data available is rich enough and important enough to be treated seriously. This is where the quantitative history of the book, or bibliometrics, comes in. It doesn’t answer all the questions, and often its answers need careful interpretation, but it does give us access to parts of book history that would otherwise be wholly inaccessible.


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