Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.authorAli, Nasreenen
dc.contributor.authorGuppy, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Malcolmen
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurchen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T14:27:17Z
dc.date.available2020-01-08T14:27:17Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-30
dc.identifier.citationGarcia R, Ali N, Guppy A, Griffiths M, Randhawa G (2020) 'Ethnic differences in risk factors for adverse birth outcomes between Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and White British mothers', Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76 (1), pp.174-182.en
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402
dc.identifier.pmid31566783
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jan.14209
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623747
dc.description.abstractAim: Reducing poor maternal and infant outcomes in pregnancy is the aim of maternity care. Adverse health behaviours lead to increased risk and can adversely mediate birth outcomes. This study examines whether risk factors are similar, different, or clustered according to maternal ethnicity. Design: Retrospective analysis of routinely collected data (2008−2013). Methods: We analysed data routinely collected data from a local University Hospital Ciconia Maternity information System (CMiS), for White British, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi women (N = 15,211) using cross-tabulations, ANCOVA, adjusted standardized residuals (ASR), and Pearson's chi-squared statistics. Results: The results demonstrate distinct clusters of risk factors between White British, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi mothers. Additionally, Pakistani mothers had the highest number of statistically significant risk factors, according to maternal ethnicity, showing that 49% of women in this cohort that were diagnosed with diabetes were Pakistani, 21.5% of White British women smoked and results showed that Bangladeshi mothers delivered the lightest weight infants (adjusted mean: 3,055.4 g). Conclusions: This study showed differences in the risk factors between White British, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi mothers. The identified risk factors were clustered by maternal ethnicity. Impact: Identification of these risk factor clusters can help policymakers and clinicians direct resources and may help reduce ethnic variation found in these populations that might be attributed to adverse health behaviours and increased risk factors.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jan.14209en
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
dc.subjectmaternityen
dc.subjecthealth behaviouren
dc.subjectnursingen
dc.subjectWhite Britishen
dc.subjectPakistanien
dc.subjectBangladeshien
dc.subjectrisk factorsen
dc.subjectB720 Midwiferyen
dc.titleEthnic differences in risk factors for adverse birth outcomes between Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and White British mothersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Advanced Nursingen
dc.date.updated2020-01-08T14:24:00Z
dc.description.notemore than 3 months since publication
html.description.abstractAim: Reducing poor maternal and infant outcomes in pregnancy is the aim of maternity care. Adverse health behaviours lead to increased risk and can adversely mediate birth outcomes. This study examines whether risk factors are similar, different, or clustered according to maternal ethnicity. Design: Retrospective analysis of routinely collected data (2008−2013). Methods: We analysed data routinely collected data from a local University Hospital Ciconia Maternity information System (CMiS), for White British, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi women (N = 15,211) using cross-tabulations, ANCOVA, adjusted standardized residuals (ASR), and Pearson's chi-squared statistics. Results: The results demonstrate distinct clusters of risk factors between White British, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi mothers. Additionally, Pakistani mothers had the highest number of statistically significant risk factors, according to maternal ethnicity, showing that 49% of women in this cohort that were diagnosed with diabetes were Pakistani, 21.5% of White British women smoked and results showed that Bangladeshi mothers delivered the lightest weight infants (adjusted mean: 3,055.4 g). Conclusions: This study showed differences in the risk factors between White British, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi mothers. The identified risk factors were clustered by maternal ethnicity. Impact: Identification of these risk factor clusters can help policymakers and clinicians direct resources and may help reduce ethnic variation found in these populations that might be attributed to adverse health behaviours and increased risk factors.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record