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dc.contributor.authorSilverman, Jonen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-19T10:11:31Z
dc.date.available2019-12-19T10:11:31Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-01
dc.identifier.citationSilverman J (2013) 'Cats, convicts and clerics : how the media and politicians have framed the Human Rights Act', in Gordon J, Rowinski P, Stewart G (ed(s).). Breaking the News, Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang pp.85-103.en
dc.identifier.isbn9783034309042
dc.identifier.doi10.3726/978-3-0353-0505-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623644
dc.description.abstractThe chapter deals with a number of related episodes in which the media - tabloid and broadsheet newspapers - colluded with ministers to 'demonise' the Human Rights Act as part of a longer-term objective of de-legitimizing the UK's membership of the European Union. It takes a number of case studies to argue that a deliberate conflation of the HRA and European Court of Human Rights with the policies of the European Union helped breed support for an anti-EU agenda in UK public policy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPeter Langen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.peterlang.com/view/title/35550en
dc.subjectmediaen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.subjecthuman rightsen
dc.subjectP300 Media studiesen
dc.titleCats, convicts and clerics : how the media and politicians have framed the Human Rights Acten
dc.title.alternativeBreaking the Newsen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.date.updated2019-12-19T10:08:54Z
html.description.abstractThe chapter deals with a number of related episodes in which the media - tabloid and broadsheet newspapers - colluded with ministers to 'demonise' the Human Rights Act as part of a longer-term objective of de-legitimizing the UK's membership of the European Union. It takes a number of case studies to argue that a deliberate conflation of the HRA and European Court of Human Rights with the policies of the European Union helped breed support for an anti-EU agenda in UK public policy.


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