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dc.contributor.authorPescheny, Julia Veraen
dc.contributor.authorGunn, Laura H.en
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurchen
dc.contributor.authorPappas, Yannisen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-10T13:47:15Z
dc.date.available2019-12-10T13:47:15Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-16
dc.identifier.citationPescheny JV, Gunn LH, Randhawa G, Pappas Y (2019) 'The impact of the Luton social prescribing programme on energy expenditure: a quantitative before-and-after study', BMJ Open, 9 (6), e026862.en
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.pmid31209089
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026862
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623621
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to assess the change in energy expenditure levels of service users after participation in the Luton social prescribing programme. Uncontrolled before-and-after study. This study was set in the East of England (Luton). Service users with complete covariate information and baseline measurements (n=146) were included in the analysis. Social prescribing, which is an initiative that aims to link patients in primary care with sources of support within the community sector to improve their health, well-being and care experience. Service users were referred to 12 sessions (free of charge), usually provided by third sector organisations. Energy expenditure measured as metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes per week. Using a Bayesian zero-inflated negative binomial model to account for a large number of observed zeros in the data, 95% posterior intervals show that energy expenditure from all levels of physical activities increased post intervention (walking 41.7% (40.31%, 43.11%); moderate 5.0% (2.94%, 7.09%); vigorous 107.3% (98.19%, 116.20%) and total 56.3% (54.77%, 57.69%)). The probability of engaging in physical activity post intervention increased, in three of four MET physical activity levels, for those individuals who were inactive at the start of the programme. Age has a negative effect on energy expenditure from any physical activity level. Similarly, working status has a negative effect on energy expenditure in all but one MET physical activity level. No consistent pattern was observed across physical activity levels in the association between gender and energy expenditure. This study shows that social prescribing may have the potential to increase the physical activity levels of service users and promote the uptake of physical activity in inactive patient groups. Results of this study can inform future research in the field, which could be of use for commissioners and policy makers.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttps://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/6/e026862en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsocial prescribingen
dc.subjectprimary careen
dc.subjectservice user outcomesen
dc.subjectB790 Nursing not elsewhere classifieden
dc.titleThe impact of the Luton social prescribing programme on energy expenditure: a quantitative before-and-after studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2044-6055
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Carolina (UNC)en
dc.contributor.departmentImperial College Londonen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Openen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6588998
dc.date.updated2019-12-10T13:44:25Z
dc.description.noteopen access article with cc licence
html.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to assess the change in energy expenditure levels of service users after participation in the Luton social prescribing programme. Uncontrolled before-and-after study. This study was set in the East of England (Luton). Service users with complete covariate information and baseline measurements (n=146) were included in the analysis. Social prescribing, which is an initiative that aims to link patients in primary care with sources of support within the community sector to improve their health, well-being and care experience. Service users were referred to 12 sessions (free of charge), usually provided by third sector organisations. Energy expenditure measured as metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes per week. Using a Bayesian zero-inflated negative binomial model to account for a large number of observed zeros in the data, 95% posterior intervals show that energy expenditure from all levels of physical activities increased post intervention (walking 41.7% (40.31%, 43.11%); moderate 5.0% (2.94%, 7.09%); vigorous 107.3% (98.19%, 116.20%) and total 56.3% (54.77%, 57.69%)). The probability of engaging in physical activity post intervention increased, in three of four MET physical activity levels, for those individuals who were inactive at the start of the programme. Age has a negative effect on energy expenditure from any physical activity level. Similarly, working status has a negative effect on energy expenditure in all but one MET physical activity level. No consistent pattern was observed across physical activity levels in the association between gender and energy expenditure. This study shows that social prescribing may have the potential to increase the physical activity levels of service users and promote the uptake of physical activity in inactive patient groups. Results of this study can inform future research in the field, which could be of use for commissioners and policy makers.


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