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dc.contributor.authorKabeya, Valenciaen
dc.contributor.authorPuthussery, Shubyen
dc.contributor.authorFurmanski, Anna L.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-02T11:14:23Z
dc.date.available2019-12-02T11:14:23Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-20
dc.identifier.citationKabeya V, Puthussery S, Furmanski A (2019) '“Health Party” intervention on genetic testing for ethnic minority women: study protocol', 12th European Public Health (EPH) Conference - Marseilles, Oxford University Press.en
dc.identifier.issn1101-1262
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/eurpub/ckz186.458
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623611
dc.description.abstractBackground Culturally appropriate interventions are needed to improve the uptake of genetic counselling and testing among ethnically diverse communities. This study aims to assess the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a “Health Party” intervention to increase awareness, knowledge and uptake of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer among ethnic minority women in the UK. Methods The “Health Party” intervention will include an educational session in a party setting. Participants will be taught by professionals about genetic testing and how to access genetic testing services in the UK National Health Service. We will recruit a sample of 60 women aged 18 years and over from key ethnic minority groups in the UK (Black African, Black Caribbean, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi) and will conduct four community based sessions, each with about 15 participants. The outcomes will primarily relate to recruitment and attrition rates, data collection, study resources and intervention delivery. A quantitative pre-post evaluation with measurements before, shortly after, and at 6 months following the intervention will be conducted to assess the preliminary effectiveness on awareness, knowledge and uptake of genetic testing. We will use three way mixed analysis of variance (MANOVA) to analyse changes pre- and post- intervention. The fidelity of the intervention including facilitation strategies, quality of delivery and participant response will be assessed. Conclusions Findings will establish the feasibility of the intervention and will provide insights into its effectiveness to increase the awareness, knowledge and uptake of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer among women from ethnic minority groups in the UK. Impact: Depending on its feasibility and effectiveness, the intervention can be used to help women from ethnic minority groups to make informed choices about genetic testing and improve early diagnosis and treatment of breast and ovarian cancer. Key messages “Health Party” may be a feasible intervention for ethnic minority women in the UK. “Health Party” intervention may increase awareness, knowledge and uptake of services.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article/29/Supplement_4/ckz186.458/5623542en
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.subjectgenetic testingen
dc.subjectethnic minoritiesen
dc.subjectH123 Public Health Engineeringen
dc.title“Health Party” intervention on genetic testing for ethnic minority women: study protocolen
dc.typeImageen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Public Healthen
dc.date.updated2019-12-02T11:10:52Z
html.description.abstractBackground Culturally appropriate interventions are needed to improve the uptake of genetic counselling and testing among ethnically diverse communities. This study aims to assess the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a “Health Party” intervention to increase awareness, knowledge and uptake of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer among ethnic minority women in the UK. Methods The “Health Party” intervention will include an educational session in a party setting. Participants will be taught by professionals about genetic testing and how to access genetic testing services in the UK National Health Service. We will recruit a sample of 60 women aged 18 years and over from key ethnic minority groups in the UK (Black African, Black Caribbean, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi) and will conduct four community based sessions, each with about 15 participants. The outcomes will primarily relate to recruitment and attrition rates, data collection, study resources and intervention delivery. A quantitative pre-post evaluation with measurements before, shortly after, and at 6 months following the intervention will be conducted to assess the preliminary effectiveness on awareness, knowledge and uptake of genetic testing. We will use three way mixed analysis of variance (MANOVA) to analyse changes pre- and post- intervention. The fidelity of the intervention including facilitation strategies, quality of delivery and participant response will be assessed. Conclusions Findings will establish the feasibility of the intervention and will provide insights into its effectiveness to increase the awareness, knowledge and uptake of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer among women from ethnic minority groups in the UK. Impact: Depending on its feasibility and effectiveness, the intervention can be used to help women from ethnic minority groups to make informed choices about genetic testing and improve early diagnosis and treatment of breast and ovarian cancer. Key messages “Health Party” may be a feasible intervention for ethnic minority women in the UK. “Health Party” intervention may increase awareness, knowledge and uptake of services.


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