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dc.contributor.authorBrown, William Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorUsacka, Agneseen
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T13:21:31Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T13:21:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-29
dc.identifier.citationBrown WM, Usacka A (2019) 'The face of early cognitive decline? Shape and asymmetry predict choice reaction time independent of age, diet or exercise', Symmetry, 11 (11), pp.1364-.en
dc.identifier.issn2073-8994
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/sym11111364
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623564
dc.description.abstractSlower reaction time is a measure of cognitive decline and can occur as early as 24 years of age. We are interested if developmental stability predicts cognitive performance independent of age and lifestyle (e.g., diet and exercise). Developmental stability is the latent capacity to buffer ontogenetic stressors and is measured by low fluctuating asymmetry (FA). FA is random – with respect to largest side – departures from perfect morphological symmetry. Degree of asymmetry has been associated with physical fitness, morbidity and mortality in many species, including humans. We expected that low FA (independent of age, diet and exercise) will predict faster choice reaction time (i.e., correct keyboard responses to stimuli appearing in a random location on a computer monitor). Eighty-eight university students self-reported their fish product consumption, exercise, had their faces 3D scanned and cognitive performance measured. Unexpectedly, increased fish product consumption was associated with worsened choice reaction time. Facial asymmetry and multiple face shape variation parameters predicted slower choice reaction time independent of sex, age, diet or exercise. Future work should develop longitudinal interventions to minimize early cognitive decline among vulnerable people (e.g., those who have experienced ontogenetic stressors affecting optimal neurocognitive development). 
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2073-8994/11/11/1364
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectevolutionary psychologyen
dc.subjectbiologyen
dc.subjectcognitionen
dc.subjectC850 Cognitive Psychologyen
dc.titleThe face of early cognitive decline? Shape and asymmetry predict choice reaction time independent of age, diet or exerciseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalSymmetryen
dc.date.updated2019-11-01T13:19:05Z
dc.description.noteCan use publishers pdf once published
html.description.abstractSlower reaction time is a measure of cognitive decline and can occur as early as 24 years of age. We are interested if developmental stability predicts cognitive performance independent of age and lifestyle (e.g., diet and exercise). Developmental stability is the latent capacity to buffer ontogenetic stressors and is measured by low fluctuating asymmetry (FA). FA is random – with respect to largest side – departures from perfect morphological symmetry. Degree of asymmetry has been associated with physical fitness, morbidity and mortality in many species, including humans. We expected that low FA (independent of age, diet and exercise) will predict faster choice reaction time (i.e., correct keyboard responses to stimuli appearing in a random location on a computer monitor). Eighty-eight university students self-reported their fish product consumption, exercise, had their faces 3D scanned and cognitive performance measured. Unexpectedly, increased fish product consumption was associated with worsened choice reaction time. Facial asymmetry and multiple face shape variation parameters predicted slower choice reaction time independent of sex, age, diet or exercise. Future work should develop longitudinal interventions to minimize early cognitive decline among vulnerable people (e.g., those who have experienced ontogenetic stressors affecting optimal neurocognitive development). 


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