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dc.contributor.authorFurmanski, Anna L.en
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Cristinaen
dc.contributor.authorBartok, Istvanen
dc.contributor.authorDimakou, Sofiaen
dc.contributor.authorRice, Jasonen
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Fredaen
dc.contributor.authorMillrain, Maggie M.en
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Julianen
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-22T15:37:25Z
dc.date.available2019-08-22T15:37:25Z
dc.date.issued2008-01-04
dc.identifier.citationFurmanski AL, Ferreira C, Bartok I, Dimakou S, Rice J, Stevenson FK, Millrain MM, Simpson E, Dyson J (2008) 'Public T cell receptor beta-chains are not advantaged during positive selection', Journal of Immunology, 180 (2), pp.1029-1039.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-1767
dc.identifier.pmid18178843
dc.identifier.doi10.4049/jimmunol.180.2.1029
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623406
dc.description.abstractStudies of human and murine T cells have shown that public TCR beta-chain rearrangements can dominate the Ag-specific and naive repertoires of distinct individuals. We show that mouse T cells responding to the minor histocompatibility Ag HYDbSmcy share an invariant Vbeta8.2-Jbeta2.3 TCR gene rearrangement. The dominance of this rearrangement shows that it successfully negotiated thymic selection and was highly favored during clonal expansion in all animals examined. We hypothesized that such beta-chains are advantaged during thymic and/or peripheral selection and, as a result, may be over-represented in the naive repertoire. A sequencing study was undertaken to examine the diversity of Vbeta8.2-Jbeta2.3 CDR3 loops from naive T cell repertoires of multiple mice. Public TCR beta-chain sequences were identified across different repertoires and MHC haplotypes. To determine whether such public beta-chains are advantaged during thymic selection, individual chains were followed through T cell development in a series of novel bone marrow competition chimeras. We demonstrate that beta-chains were positively selected with similar efficiency regardless of CDR3 loop sequence. Therefore, the establishment and maintenance of public beta-chains in the periphery is predominantly controlled by post-thymic events through modification of the primary, thymus-derived TCR repertoire.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Immunologistsen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.jimmunol.org/content/180/2/1029en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.subjectT cellen
dc.subjectC550 Immunologyen
dc.titlePublic T cell receptor beta-chains are not advantaged during positive selectionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Immunologyen
dc.date.updated2019-08-22T15:07:11Z
html.description.abstractStudies of human and murine T cells have shown that public TCR beta-chain rearrangements can dominate the Ag-specific and naive repertoires of distinct individuals. We show that mouse T cells responding to the minor histocompatibility Ag HYDbSmcy share an invariant Vbeta8.2-Jbeta2.3 TCR gene rearrangement. The dominance of this rearrangement shows that it successfully negotiated thymic selection and was highly favored during clonal expansion in all animals examined. We hypothesized that such beta-chains are advantaged during thymic and/or peripheral selection and, as a result, may be over-represented in the naive repertoire. A sequencing study was undertaken to examine the diversity of Vbeta8.2-Jbeta2.3 CDR3 loops from naive T cell repertoires of multiple mice. Public TCR beta-chain sequences were identified across different repertoires and MHC haplotypes. To determine whether such public beta-chains are advantaged during thymic selection, individual chains were followed through T cell development in a series of novel bone marrow competition chimeras. We demonstrate that beta-chains were positively selected with similar efficiency regardless of CDR3 loop sequence. Therefore, the establishment and maintenance of public beta-chains in the periphery is predominantly controlled by post-thymic events through modification of the primary, thymus-derived TCR repertoire.


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