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dc.contributor.authorSochos, Antigonosen
dc.contributor.authorYahya, Fatahyahen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-27T11:50:00Z
dc.date.available2019-03-27T11:50:00Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-07
dc.identifier.citationSochos A, Yahya F (2015) 'Attachment style and relationship difficulties in parents of children with ADHD', Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24 (12), pp.3711-3722.en
dc.identifier.issn1062-1024
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10826-015-0179-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623225
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies report that parents of children with ADHD often experience difficulties in their couple relationship. The present study investigated the role of adult attachment style in relation to problems with dyadic adjustment and conflict communication. A cross-sectional design was employed, involving 98 parents of children and adolescents with ADHD and 153 parents of offspring without the disorder (age range in 3 to 19). Participants completed the following: Experiences in Close Relationships Questionnaire-R, Communications Pattern Questionnaire, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and Conner's Parent Rating Scale–48. According to the findings, the two parental groups differed regarding relationship difficulties only when attachment style was controlled for. Moreover, attachment avoidance moderated the impact of having a child with ADHD on dyadic adjustment while attachment anxiety moderated such an impact on conflict communication. Also, parents of children with less severe ADHD symptoms were more likely to experience relationship problems, while having a child with ADHD moderated the effects of gender on the roles taken in demand-withdraw communication. Considering adult attachment style may provide useful insights into how parents of children with ADHD relate to each other and may inform supportive interventions.    
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-015-0179-6en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.subjectattachmenten
dc.subjectattachment styleen
dc.subjectdyadic adjustmenten
dc.subjectconflict communicationen
dc.subjectdemand withdrawen
dc.subjectparents of children with ADHDen
dc.subjectADHDen
dc.subjectL900 Others in Social studiesen
dc.titleAttachment style and relationship difficulties in parents of children with ADHDen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Malaysia Sarawaken
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Child and Family Studiesen
dc.date.updated2019-03-27T11:46:57Z
dc.description.notepre April 2016
html.description.abstractPrevious studies report that parents of children with ADHD often experience difficulties in their couple relationship. The present study investigated the role of adult attachment style in relation to problems with dyadic adjustment and conflict communication. A cross-sectional design was employed, involving 98 parents of children and adolescents with ADHD and 153 parents of offspring without the disorder (age range in 3 to 19). Participants completed the following: Experiences in Close Relationships Questionnaire-R, Communications Pattern Questionnaire, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and Conner's Parent Rating Scale–48. According to the findings, the two parental groups differed regarding relationship difficulties only when attachment style was controlled for. Moreover, attachment avoidance moderated the impact of having a child with ADHD on dyadic adjustment while attachment anxiety moderated such an impact on conflict communication. Also, parents of children with less severe ADHD symptoms were more likely to experience relationship problems, while having a child with ADHD moderated the effects of gender on the roles taken in demand-withdraw communication. Considering adult attachment style may provide useful insights into how parents of children with ADHD relate to each other and may inform supportive interventions.    


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