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dc.contributor.authorZakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.en
dc.contributor.authorGillison, Fiona B.en
dc.contributor.authorKatzmarzyk, Peter T.en
dc.contributor.authorMire, Emily F.en
dc.contributor.authorBroyles, Stephanie T.en
dc.contributor.authorChampagne, Catherine M.en
dc.contributor.authorChaput, Jean-Philippeen
dc.contributor.authorDenstel, Kara D.en
dc.contributor.authorFogelholm, Mikaelen
dc.contributor.authorHu, Gangen
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Estelle V.en
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorMaia, Joseen
dc.contributor.authorOlds, Timen
dc.contributor.authorOnywera, Vincenten
dc.contributor.authorSarmiento, Olga L.en
dc.contributor.authorTremblay, Mark S.en
dc.contributor.authorTudor-Locke, Catrineen
dc.contributor.authorStandage, Martynen
dc.contributor.authorISCOLE Research Groupen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-21T11:31:00Z
dc.date.available2019-03-21T11:31:00Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-21
dc.identifier.citationZakrzewski-Fruer JK, Gillison FB, Katzmarzyk PT, Mire EF, Broyles ST, Champagne CM, Chaput JP, Denstel KD, Fogelholm M, Hu G, Lambert EV, Maher C, Maia J, Olds T, Onywera V, Sarmiento OL, Tremblay MS, Tudor-Locke C, Standage M; ISCOLE Research Group. (2019) 'Association between breakfast frequency and physical activity and sedentary time: a cross-sectional study in children from 12 countries', BMC Public Health, 19 (1), pp.222-.en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-019-6542-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623206
dc.description.abstractBackground: Existing research has documented inconsistent findings for the associations among breakfast frequency, physical activity (PA), and sedentary time in children. The primary aim of this study was to examine the associations among breakfast frequency and objectively-measured PA and sedentary time in a sample of children from 12 countries representing a wide range of human development, economic development and inequality. The secondary aim was to examine interactions of these associations between study sites. Methods: This multinational, cross-sectional study included 6228 children aged 9-11 years from the 12 International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment sites. Multilevel statistical models were used to examine associations between self-reported habitual breakfast frequency defined using three categories (breakfast consumed 0 to 2 days/week [rare], 3 to 5 days/week [occasional] or 6 to 7 days/week [frequent]) or two categories (breakfast consumed less than daily or daily) and accelerometry-derived PA and sedentary time during the morning (wake time to 1200 h) and afternoon (1200 h to bed time) with study site included as an interaction term. Model covariates included age, sex, highest parental education, body mass index z-score, and accelerometer waking wear time. Results: Participants averaged 60 (s.d. 25) min/day in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), 315 (s.d. 53) min/day in light PA and 513 (s.d. 69) min/day sedentary. Controlling for covariates, breakfast frequency was not significantly associated with total daily or afternoon PA and sedentary time. For the morning, frequent breakfast consumption was associated with higher proportion of time in MVPA (0.3%), a higher proportion of time in light PA (1.0%) and lower min/day and proportion of time sedentary (3.4 min/day and 1.3%) than rare breakfast consumption (all p ≤ 0.05). No significant associations were found when comparing occasional with rare or frequent breakfast consumption, or daily with less than daily breakfast consumption. Very few significant interactions with study site were found. Conclusions: In this multinational sample of children, frequent breakfast consumption was associated with higher MVPA and light PA time and lower sedentary time in the morning when compared with rare breakfast consumption, although the small magnitude of the associations may lack clinical relevance.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMCen
dc.relation.urlhttps://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-019-6542-6en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbreakfasten
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectexerciseen
dc.subjectnutritionen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.titleAssociation between breakfast frequency and physical activity and sedentary time: a cross-sectional study in children from 12 countriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bathen
dc.contributor.departmentPennington Biomedical Research Centreen
dc.contributor.departmentCHEOen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Helsinkien
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Cape Townen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of South Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Portoen
dc.contributor.departmentKenyatta Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversidad de los Andesen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Massachusettsen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Public Healthen
dc.date.updated2019-03-20T12:46:15Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Existing research has documented inconsistent findings for the associations among breakfast frequency, physical activity (PA), and sedentary time in children. The primary aim of this study was to examine the associations among breakfast frequency and objectively-measured PA and sedentary time in a sample of children from 12 countries representing a wide range of human development, economic development and inequality. The secondary aim was to examine interactions of these associations between study sites. Methods: This multinational, cross-sectional study included 6228 children aged 9-11 years from the 12 International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment sites. Multilevel statistical models were used to examine associations between self-reported habitual breakfast frequency defined using three categories (breakfast consumed 0 to 2 days/week [rare], 3 to 5 days/week [occasional] or 6 to 7 days/week [frequent]) or two categories (breakfast consumed less than daily or daily) and accelerometry-derived PA and sedentary time during the morning (wake time to 1200 h) and afternoon (1200 h to bed time) with study site included as an interaction term. Model covariates included age, sex, highest parental education, body mass index z-score, and accelerometer waking wear time. Results: Participants averaged 60 (s.d. 25) min/day in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), 315 (s.d. 53) min/day in light PA and 513 (s.d. 69) min/day sedentary. Controlling for covariates, breakfast frequency was not significantly associated with total daily or afternoon PA and sedentary time. For the morning, frequent breakfast consumption was associated with higher proportion of time in MVPA (0.3%), a higher proportion of time in light PA (1.0%) and lower min/day and proportion of time sedentary (3.4 min/day and 1.3%) than rare breakfast consumption (all p ≤ 0.05). No significant associations were found when comparing occasional with rare or frequent breakfast consumption, or daily with less than daily breakfast consumption. Very few significant interactions with study site were found. Conclusions: In this multinational sample of children, frequent breakfast consumption was associated with higher MVPA and light PA time and lower sedentary time in the morning when compared with rare breakfast consumption, although the small magnitude of the associations may lack clinical relevance.


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