Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Sean J.en
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Iain M.en
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Joanna C.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-21T11:30:39Z
dc.date.available2019-03-21T11:30:39Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-31
dc.identifier.citationMaloney SJ., Fletcher IM, Richards J. (2016) 'A comparison of methods to determine bilateral asymmetries in vertical leg stiffness', Journal of Sports Sciences, 34 (9), pp.829-835.en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640414.2015.1075055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623203
dc.description.abstractWhilst the measurement and quantification of vertical leg stiffness (Kvert) asymmetry is of important practical relevance to athletic performance, literature investigating bilateral asymmetry in Kvert is limited. Moreover, how the type of task used to assess Kvert may affect the expression of asymmetry has not been properly determined. Twelve healthy males performed three types of performance task on a dual force plate system to determine Kvert asymmetries; the tasks were: a) bilateral hopping, b) bilateral drop jumping, and c) unilateral drop jumping. Across all three methods, Kvert was significantly different between compliant and stiff limbs (P < 0.001) with a significant interaction effect between limb and method (P = 0.005). Differences in Kvert between compliant and stiff limbs were -5.3% (P < 0.001), -21.8% (P = 0.007) and -15.1% (P < 0.001) for the bilateral hopping, bilateral drop jumping and unilateral drop jumping methods respectively. All three methods were able to detect significant differences between compliant and stiff limbs, and could be used as a diagnostic tool to assess Kvert asymmetry. Drop jumping tasks detected larger Kvert asymmetries than hopping, suggesting that asymmetries may be expressed to a greater extent in acyclic, maximal performance tasks.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2015.1075055en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectleg-spring behaviouren
dc.titleA comparison of methods to determine bilateral asymmetries in vertical leg stiffnessen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
dc.date.updated2019-03-20T12:46:18Z
html.description.abstractWhilst the measurement and quantification of vertical leg stiffness (Kvert) asymmetry is of important practical relevance to athletic performance, literature investigating bilateral asymmetry in Kvert is limited. Moreover, how the type of task used to assess Kvert may affect the expression of asymmetry has not been properly determined. Twelve healthy males performed three types of performance task on a dual force plate system to determine Kvert asymmetries; the tasks were: a) bilateral hopping, b) bilateral drop jumping, and c) unilateral drop jumping. Across all three methods, Kvert was significantly different between compliant and stiff limbs (P < 0.001) with a significant interaction effect between limb and method (P = 0.005). Differences in Kvert between compliant and stiff limbs were -5.3% (P < 0.001), -21.8% (P = 0.007) and -15.1% (P < 0.001) for the bilateral hopping, bilateral drop jumping and unilateral drop jumping methods respectively. All three methods were able to detect significant differences between compliant and stiff limbs, and could be used as a diagnostic tool to assess Kvert asymmetry. Drop jumping tasks detected larger Kvert asymmetries than hopping, suggesting that asymmetries may be expressed to a greater extent in acyclic, maximal performance tasks.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Comparison+of+methods+to+deter ...
Size:
217.0Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Green - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Green - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF