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dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-01T10:17:24Z
dc.date.available2019-03-01T10:17:24Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-01
dc.identifier.citationKinman G. (2019) 'Effort-reward imbalance in academic employees: examining different reward systems', International Journal of Stress Management, 26 (2), pp.184-192.en
dc.identifier.issn1072-5245
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/str0000128
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623196
dc.description.abstractThis study draws upon the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress to predict mental and physical health in academic employees working in UK universities. It examines the main and interactive effects of extrinsic efforts over time and the three reward systems of the ERI model independently (i.e. promotion, esteem and security rewards). The main and interactive effects of intrinsic effort (known as overcommitment) in predicting health status are also examined. A sample of 458 academic employees completed ERI scales at baseline and the health measures 14 months later. The results showed that higher extrinsic effort, lower esteem and security rewards and an imbalance between efforts and esteem rewards assessed at Time 1 predicted mental health status on follow-up. Physical health symptoms were predicted by higher extrinsic effort and lower security rewards. Overcommitment was an independent risk factor for both mental and physical health. No further contribution was made to the variance in either outcome by the other effort-reward ratios independently or by their interactions with overcommitment. Interventions are suggested that have potential to reduce extrinsic and intrinsic efforts and increase rewards in the university sector.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAPAen
dc.relation.urlhttps://psycnet.apa.org/doi/10.1037/str0000128
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectrewardsen
dc.subjecteffort–reward imbalanceen
dc.subjectC800 Psychologyen
dc.titleEffort-reward imbalance in academic employees: examining different reward systemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Stress Managementen
dc.date.updated2019-03-01T10:15:12Z
dc.description.noteSherpaRomeo has no embargo for this title so change embargo date to publication date when published.
html.description.abstractThis study draws upon the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress to predict mental and physical health in academic employees working in UK universities. It examines the main and interactive effects of extrinsic efforts over time and the three reward systems of the ERI model independently (i.e. promotion, esteem and security rewards). The main and interactive effects of intrinsic effort (known as overcommitment) in predicting health status are also examined. A sample of 458 academic employees completed ERI scales at baseline and the health measures 14 months later. The results showed that higher extrinsic effort, lower esteem and security rewards and an imbalance between efforts and esteem rewards assessed at Time 1 predicted mental health status on follow-up. Physical health symptoms were predicted by higher extrinsic effort and lower security rewards. Overcommitment was an independent risk factor for both mental and physical health. No further contribution was made to the variance in either outcome by the other effort-reward ratios independently or by their interactions with overcommitment. Interventions are suggested that have potential to reduce extrinsic and intrinsic efforts and increase rewards in the university sector.


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