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dc.contributor.authorPowell, Fayeen
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorHaycraft, Emmaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-14T14:10:31Z
dc.date.available2019-02-14T14:10:31Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-18
dc.identifier.citationPowell F, Farrow C, Meyer C, Haycraft E (2018) 'The stability and continuity of maternally reported and observed child eating behaviours and feeding practices across early childhood', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (5), pp.1017-.en
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.pmid29783638
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph15051017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623156
dc.description.abstractGiven that many eating behaviours and food preferences develop early in childhood and track across childhood, adolescence and into adulthood, interest has grown in the developmental trajectory of these behaviours. The aims of this study were twofold. First, to explore whether maternal reports of child eating behaviour and feeding practices are validated by independent observations of these constructs. Second, to explore the continuity and stability of both maternally reported and independently observed child eating behaviours and maternal feeding practices during early childhood. Sixty-five mothers completed measures of their child's eating behaviour and their own feeding practices and mother⁻child dyads were observed during a family mealtime at approximately 3 and 4 years of age. Maternal reports of their child's eating behaviours were validated by independent observations, however maternally reported feeding practices were not validated by observations of these behaviours. Maternally reported and independently observed child eating behaviours and parental feeding practices remained stable and showed continuity between 3 and 4 years of age, with the exception of child difficulty to feed and maternal pressure to eat which both significantly decreased over time. Findings provide an insight into the validity of maternal reports of fussy eating behaviour and parental feeding practices and the developmental trajectory of these behaviours across early childhood.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/5/1017en
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982056/en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectfussy eatingen
dc.subjectparental feeding practicesen
dc.subjecteating behaviouren
dc.subjectchild healthen
dc.subjectlongitudinal researchen
dc.subjectobservationen
dc.subjectvalidationen
dc.subjectC820 Developmental Psychologyen
dc.titleThe stability and continuity of maternally reported and observed child eating behaviours and feeding practices across early childhooden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentAston Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Warwicken
dc.contributor.departmentLoughborough Universityen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5982056
dc.date.updated2019-02-14T14:06:00Z
dc.description.noteoa article
html.description.abstractGiven that many eating behaviours and food preferences develop early in childhood and track across childhood, adolescence and into adulthood, interest has grown in the developmental trajectory of these behaviours. The aims of this study were twofold. First, to explore whether maternal reports of child eating behaviour and feeding practices are validated by independent observations of these constructs. Second, to explore the continuity and stability of both maternally reported and independently observed child eating behaviours and maternal feeding practices during early childhood. Sixty-five mothers completed measures of their child's eating behaviour and their own feeding practices and mother⁻child dyads were observed during a family mealtime at approximately 3 and 4 years of age. Maternal reports of their child's eating behaviours were validated by independent observations, however maternally reported feeding practices were not validated by observations of these behaviours. Maternally reported and independently observed child eating behaviours and parental feeding practices remained stable and showed continuity between 3 and 4 years of age, with the exception of child difficulty to feed and maternal pressure to eat which both significantly decreased over time. Findings provide an insight into the validity of maternal reports of fussy eating behaviour and parental feeding practices and the developmental trajectory of these behaviours across early childhood.


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