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dc.contributor.authorChkeir, Alyen
dc.contributor.authorJaber, Ranaen
dc.contributor.authorHewson, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorDuchêne, Jacquesen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-28T13:29:34Z
dc.date.available2019-01-28T13:29:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-01
dc.identifier.citationChkeir A, Jaber R, Hewson DJ, Duchêne J (2013) 'Estimation of grip force using the Grip-ball dynamometer', Medical engineering & physics, 35 (11), pp.1698-702.en
dc.identifier.issn1873-4030
dc.identifier.pmid23727154
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.medengphy.2013.05.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/623107
dc.description.abstractThe Grip-ball is an innovative device that has been designed to measure grip strength. The Grip-ball consists of an airtight ball that contains a pressure sensor and Bluetooth communication system. The Grip-ball can be inflated to different initial pressures, with data available continuously in real time. The aim of this study was to build a model to predict the force applied to the Grip-ball dynamometer based only on the pressure measured by the Grip-ball and its initial pressure. Forces ranging from 2 to 70 kg were applied to a hybrid version of the device for 10 different initial pressures, ranging from atmospheric pressure of 100 kPa through to 190 kPa. A model was constructed to predict applied force, with force as a function of the initial pressure and the pressure measured. The error of the model was calculated as 1.29 kg across all initial pressures and forces applied. The results of the study are comparable with the errors observed for the gold standard in grip force measurement, the Jamar dynamometer. The best results for force prediction were obtained over the range in which frailty is typically detected. The Grip-ball will now be tested using a large population in order to establish clinical norms.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1350453313001082en
dc.subjecthand gripen
dc.titleEstimation of grip force using the Grip-ball dynamometeren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMedical engineering & physicsen
dc.date.updated2019-01-28T13:27:12Z
html.description.abstractThe Grip-ball is an innovative device that has been designed to measure grip strength. The Grip-ball consists of an airtight ball that contains a pressure sensor and Bluetooth communication system. The Grip-ball can be inflated to different initial pressures, with data available continuously in real time. The aim of this study was to build a model to predict the force applied to the Grip-ball dynamometer based only on the pressure measured by the Grip-ball and its initial pressure. Forces ranging from 2 to 70 kg were applied to a hybrid version of the device for 10 different initial pressures, ranging from atmospheric pressure of 100 kPa through to 190 kPa. A model was constructed to predict applied force, with force as a function of the initial pressure and the pressure measured. The error of the model was calculated as 1.29 kg across all initial pressures and forces applied. The results of the study are comparable with the errors observed for the gold standard in grip force measurement, the Jamar dynamometer. The best results for force prediction were obtained over the range in which frailty is typically detected. The Grip-ball will now be tested using a large population in order to establish clinical norms.


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