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dc.contributor.authorRamasamy Venkatasalu, M.en
dc.contributor.authorSirala Jagadeesh, N.en
dc.contributor.authorElavally, B.en
dc.contributor.authorPappas, Yannisen
dc.contributor.authorMhlanga, F.en
dc.contributor.authorPallipalayam Varatharajan, R.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-25T09:22:00Z
dc.date.available2018-09-25T09:22:00Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-30
dc.identifier.citationRamasamy Venkatasalu M, Sirala Jagadeesh N, Elavally B, Pappas Y, Mhlanga F, Pallipalayam Varatharajan R. (2017) 'Public, patient and carers’ views on palliative and end‐of‐life care in India: a systematic review', International Nursing Review, 65 (2), pp.292-301.en
dc.identifier.issn0020-8132
dc.identifier.pmid28856680
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/inr.12403
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622892
dc.description.abstractAim To systematically review the existing evidence on the Indian public, patient and carers’ perspectives on palliative and end‐of‐life care. Background With a growing population of terminally ill people across the world, there is also an increasing awareness among international health policy makers of the need to improve the quality of life for terminally ill patients. Understanding service users’ (patients, family and public) perspectives is crucial in developing and sustaining successful community‐centred palliative nursing policies and service models especially in countries like India with diverse population. Methods An integrative review was performed on five databases, using hand searches of key journals and reference citation tracking for empirical studies published in English from 1990 to 2015. A thematic analysis framework was used to analyse and identify key themes. Results Analysis of the six eligible studies revealed five themes. Themes describe how social, economic, cultural, religious, spiritual and traditional factors influenced the palliative and end‐of‐life care perspectives and experiences among Indians. They also illustrated preferences relating to place of care, as well as benefits and challenges of family caregiving during the last days of life. Conclusions Although we found minimal evidence on user perspectives, nurses need to aware of those unique components of context‐specific palliative and end‐of‐life care practices in India – socioeconomic, cultural and religious factors – on their nursing encounters. Nurses need to advocate same in policy development to enable accessibility and utility of palliative and end‐of‐life care services, which are scant in India. Implications for nursing and health policy Nurses can be central in gathering the contextual evidence that advocate users’ perspectives to inform further studies and national palliative care policies in India. Emerging policies in nursing education need to focus on integrating family‐centred palliative and end‐of‐life care within curricula, whereas nursing practice may promote nurse‐led community models to address the patchy palliative and end‐of‐life service provision in India.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/inr.12403/abstracten
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
dc.subjectend-of-life careen
dc.subjectpalliative careen
dc.subjectIndiaen
dc.subjectB701 Palliative Care Nursingen
dc.titlePublic, patient and carers’ views on palliative and end‐of‐life care in India: a systematic reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Nursing Reviewen
dc.date.updated2018-09-25T08:57:09Z
dc.description.notePlease supply postprint (final draft post-refereeing) for deposit in the repository for REF compliance. The published version/final PDF cannot be deposited in the repository. Resubmitted still with no file attached. As now past 3 months from publication, not chasing further. 25/9/18
html.description.abstractAim To systematically review the existing evidence on the Indian public, patient and carers’ perspectives on palliative and end‐of‐life care. Background With a growing population of terminally ill people across the world, there is also an increasing awareness among international health policy makers of the need to improve the quality of life for terminally ill patients. Understanding service users’ (patients, family and public) perspectives is crucial in developing and sustaining successful community‐centred palliative nursing policies and service models especially in countries like India with diverse population. Methods An integrative review was performed on five databases, using hand searches of key journals and reference citation tracking for empirical studies published in English from 1990 to 2015. A thematic analysis framework was used to analyse and identify key themes. Results Analysis of the six eligible studies revealed five themes. Themes describe how social, economic, cultural, religious, spiritual and traditional factors influenced the palliative and end‐of‐life care perspectives and experiences among Indians. They also illustrated preferences relating to place of care, as well as benefits and challenges of family caregiving during the last days of life. Conclusions Although we found minimal evidence on user perspectives, nurses need to aware of those unique components of context‐specific palliative and end‐of‐life care practices in India – socioeconomic, cultural and religious factors – on their nursing encounters. Nurses need to advocate same in policy development to enable accessibility and utility of palliative and end‐of‐life care services, which are scant in India. Implications for nursing and health policy Nurses can be central in gathering the contextual evidence that advocate users’ perspectives to inform further studies and national palliative care policies in India. Emerging policies in nursing education need to focus on integrating family‐centred palliative and end‐of‐life care within curricula, whereas nursing practice may promote nurse‐led community models to address the patchy palliative and end‐of‐life service provision in India.


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