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dc.contributor.authorHill, Deborahen
dc.contributor.authorHolloway, Catherine Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorRamirez, Dafne Zuleima Morgadoen
dc.contributor.authorSmitham, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorPappas, Yannisen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-25T09:21:20Z
dc.date.available2018-09-25T09:21:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-29
dc.identifier.citationHill D, Holloway CS, Ramirez DZM, Smitham P, Pappas Y (2017) 'What are user perspectives of exoskeleton technology? A literature review', International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 33 (2), pp.160-167.en
dc.identifier.issn0266-4623
dc.identifier.pmid28849760
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0266462317000460
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622888
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Exoskeletons are electromechanical devices that are worn by a human operator to increase their physical performance. Several exoskeletons have been developed to restore functional movements, such as walking, for those with paralysis due to neurological impairment. However, existing exoskeletons have limitations with respect to affordability, size, weight, speed, and efficiency, which may reduce their functional application. Therefore, the aim of this scoping review is to collect and narratively synthesize the perspectives of users of exoskeleton technology.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted across several healthcare related online databases.Results: A total of 4,619 articles were identified, of which 51 were selected for full review. Only three studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, one showed an incongruence between users' expectations and experiences of device use; another reported perspectives on potential rather than actual device use, ranking design features in order of perceived importance; and the other reported ratings of ease of device use in training.Conclusions: The heterogeneity of studies included within this review, leave the authors unable to suggest consensus as to user perspectives of exoskeleton technology. However, it is apparent that users are able to suggest priorities for exoskeleton design and that users' perspectives of exoskeleton technology might change in response to experience of use. The authors, therefore, suggest that exoskeleton design should be an iterative process, whereby user perspectives are sought, incorporated and refined by tangible experience, to ensure that devices developed are acceptable to and usable by the populations they seek to re-enable.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge the support of the wider Wearable Assistive Material (WAM) Project Group: Richard Jackson; Mark Miodownik; Benjamin Oldham; Kristopher Page; Quentin Pankhurst; Ivan Parkin; Mark Ransley; Nick Tyler; and Rhys Williams. This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (grant number EP/K020323/1). Mrs. Hill reports grants from Engineering & Physical Sciences Research Council, during the conduct of the study. Dr. Holloway, Morgado Ramirez, and Smitham report grants from EPSRC during the conduct of the study. Dr. Pappas has nothing to disclose.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/international-journal-of-technology-assessment-in-health-care/article/what-are-user-perspectives-of-exoskeleton-technology-a-literature-review/4592BEC546960D1FAD2DF707AA3B3031en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectspinal cord injuriesen
dc.subjectroboticsen
dc.subjectbionicsen
dc.subjectquipment designen
dc.subjectexoskeletonen
dc.subjectB800 Medical Technologyen
dc.titleWhat are user perspectives of exoskeleton technology? A literature reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentJersey General Hospitalen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Careen
dc.date.updated2018-09-25T08:57:13Z
dc.description.notePlease supply postprint (final draft postrefereeing) for REF compliance, which can be deposited in the repository. The publisher's version/final pdf cannot be depos as is past 3 months from publication, not chasing again - however have found compliant copy at http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10052121/3/Holloway_resubmission 14Jan2016.pdf. 25/9/18
html.description.abstractObjectives: Exoskeletons are electromechanical devices that are worn by a human operator to increase their physical performance. Several exoskeletons have been developed to restore functional movements, such as walking, for those with paralysis due to neurological impairment. However, existing exoskeletons have limitations with respect to affordability, size, weight, speed, and efficiency, which may reduce their functional application. Therefore, the aim of this scoping review is to collect and narratively synthesize the perspectives of users of exoskeleton technology.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted across several healthcare related online databases.Results: A total of 4,619 articles were identified, of which 51 were selected for full review. Only three studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, one showed an incongruence between users' expectations and experiences of device use; another reported perspectives on potential rather than actual device use, ranking design features in order of perceived importance; and the other reported ratings of ease of device use in training.Conclusions: The heterogeneity of studies included within this review, leave the authors unable to suggest consensus as to user perspectives of exoskeleton technology. However, it is apparent that users are able to suggest priorities for exoskeleton design and that users' perspectives of exoskeleton technology might change in response to experience of use. The authors, therefore, suggest that exoskeleton design should be an iterative process, whereby user perspectives are sought, incorporated and refined by tangible experience, to ensure that devices developed are acceptable to and usable by the populations they seek to re-enable.


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