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dc.contributor.authorLi, Yunzhouen
dc.contributor.authorMuhammad, Tayaben
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yongen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Dalongen
dc.contributor.authorCrabbe, M. James C.en
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Yanen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-10T11:44:55Z
dc.date.available2018-07-10T11:44:55Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-10
dc.identifier.citationLi Y, Muhammad T, Wang Y, Zhang D, Crabbe M.J.C., Liang Y (2018) 'Salicylic acid collaborates with gene silencing to tomato defense against tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)', PAKISTAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY, 50 (5), pp.2041-2054.en
dc.identifier.issn0556-3321
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622797
dc.description.abstractAntiviral research in plants has been focused on RNA silencing (i.e. RNA interference), and several studies suggest that salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance is a key part of plant antiviral defense. However, the antiviral defense mechanism of SA-mediation is still unclear, and several recent studies have suggested a connection between SA-mediated defense and RNA silencing, which needs further characterization in TYLCV infection. In this study, both SA-mediated defense and the RNA silencing mechanism were observed to play an important role in the antiviral response against TYLCV. First, we found that SA application enhanced the resistance to TYLCV in tomato plants. The expression of RNA-silencing-related genes, such as SlDCL1, SlDCL2, SlDCL4, SlRDR2, SlRDR3a, SlRDR6a, SlAGO1, and SlAGO4, were significantly triggered by exogenous SA application and inoculation with TYLCV, respectively. Furthermore, silencing of SlDCL2, SlDCL4 in tomato resulted in attenuated resistance to TYLCV, and reduced the expression of defense-related genes (SlPR1 and SlPR1b) in SA-mediated defense after infection with TYLCV, particularly in SlDCL2/SlDCL4-silenced plants. Taken together, we conclude that SA collaborates with gene silencing in tomato defense against TYLCV.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPakistan Botanical Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pakbs.org/pjbot/papers/1527619777.pdfen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsalicylic aciden
dc.subjectgene silencingen
dc.subjecttomato yellow leaf curl virusen
dc.subjectC400 Geneticsen
dc.subjectgeneticsen
dc.titleSalicylic acid collaborates with gene silencing to tomato defense against tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorthwest A&F Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentGuizhou Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentShangdong Agricultural Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Oxforden
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalPAKISTAN JOURNAL OF BOTANYen
dc.date.updated2018-07-10T11:35:11Z
dc.description.noteJournal makes article freely available but no sign of a creative commons licence or policy. Emailed to ask if they have any objection RVO 10/7/18
html.description.abstractAntiviral research in plants has been focused on RNA silencing (i.e. RNA interference), and several studies suggest that salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance is a key part of plant antiviral defense. However, the antiviral defense mechanism of SA-mediation is still unclear, and several recent studies have suggested a connection between SA-mediated defense and RNA silencing, which needs further characterization in TYLCV infection. In this study, both SA-mediated defense and the RNA silencing mechanism were observed to play an important role in the antiviral response against TYLCV. First, we found that SA application enhanced the resistance to TYLCV in tomato plants. The expression of RNA-silencing-related genes, such as SlDCL1, SlDCL2, SlDCL4, SlRDR2, SlRDR3a, SlRDR6a, SlAGO1, and SlAGO4, were significantly triggered by exogenous SA application and inoculation with TYLCV, respectively. Furthermore, silencing of SlDCL2, SlDCL4 in tomato resulted in attenuated resistance to TYLCV, and reduced the expression of defense-related genes (SlPR1 and SlPR1b) in SA-mediated defense after infection with TYLCV, particularly in SlDCL2/SlDCL4-silenced plants. Taken together, we conclude that SA collaborates with gene silencing in tomato defense against TYLCV.


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