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dc.contributor.authorSchwabenland, Christinaen
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, Francesen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-03T10:32:32Z
dc.date.available2018-07-03T10:32:32Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-18
dc.identifier.citationSchwabenland C, Tomlinson F (2015) 'Shadows and light: diversity management as phantasmagoria', Human Relations, 68 (12), pp.1913-1936.en
dc.identifier.issn0018-7267
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0018726715574587
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622791
dc.description.abstract Within the field of critical diversity studies increasing reference is made to the need for more critically informed research into the practice and implementation of diversity management. This article draws on an action research project that involved diversity practitioners from within the UK voluntary sector. In their accounts of resistance, reluctance and a lack of effective organizational engagement, participants shared a perception of diversity management as something difficult to concretize and envisage; and as something that organizational members associated with fear and anxiety; and with an inability to act. We draw on the metaphor of the phantasmagoria as a means to investigate this representation. We conclude with some tentative suggestions for alternative ways of doing diversity. 
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0018726715574587en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.subjectdiversity managementen
dc.subjectN600 Human Resource Managementen
dc.titleShadows and light: diversity management as phantasmagoriaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentLondon Metropolitan Universityen
dc.identifier.journalHuman Relationsen
dc.date.updated2018-07-03T09:07:19Z
dc.description.notePrior to April 2016 so not chasing full text file.
html.description.abstract Within the field of critical diversity studies increasing reference is made to the need for more critically informed research into the practice and implementation of diversity management. This article draws on an action research project that involved diversity practitioners from within the UK voluntary sector. In their accounts of resistance, reluctance and a lack of effective organizational engagement, participants shared a perception of diversity management as something difficult to concretize and envisage; and as something that organizational members associated with fear and anxiety; and with an inability to act. We draw on the metaphor of the phantasmagoria as a means to investigate this representation. We conclude with some tentative suggestions for alternative ways of doing diversity. 


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