Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPearce, Samanthaen
dc.contributor.authorWeedon, Alexisen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-01T10:52:37Z
dc.date.available2017-12-01T10:52:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-30
dc.identifier.citationPearce S, Weedon A (2017) 'Film adaptation for knowing audiences: analysing fan on-line responses to the end of Breaking Dawn – Part 2 (2012)', Participations: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies, 14 (2), pp.176-202.en
dc.identifier.issn1749-8716
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622436
dc.description.abstractCritics of film adaptations of literary works have historically evaluated the success or failure of the movie on the grounds of its fidelity to the original book. In contrast popular arguments for medium specificity have questioned whether fidelity is possible when adapting one medium to another. This article follows recent academic work which has focused awareness on the processes of adaptation by examining evidence of reading and viewing experience in online and social media forums.      The broader research project explored the online Twilight fan community as an example of a ‘knowing audience’ acquainted with both novel and film. Here we focus on the strong response within fan forums to the surprise ending of the final film adaptation Breaking Dawn – Part 2 (2012). The research uses the forum, blog and facebook page as sites for evidence of reading experience as defined by the Reading Experience Database (RED). The analysis sheds new light on the tensions that exist between fidelity and deviation and the article positions fan audiences as intensive readers who gained unexpected pleasure from a deviation from a canon. It argues that fans are also collaborators within the adaptation process who respect authorial authority and discuss the author’s, scriptwriter’s and director’s interpretation of the novel for the screen. The research identifies the creative and commercial advantages to be gained from a collaborative and open dialogue between adaptors and fans.  Keywords: Adaptation, fandom, online fan communities, Twilight, reading experience, film, audiences, fidelity, canon, collaboration, screenwriting, franchise, Stephenie Meyer, Melissa Rosenberg, Bill Condon
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.participations.org/Volume 14/Issue 2/9.pdfen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectadaptationen
dc.subjectfandomen
dc.subjectonline fan communitiesen
dc.subjectTwilighten
dc.subjectreading experienceen
dc.subjectaudiencesen
dc.subjectfilmen
dc.subjectfidelityen
dc.subjectcanonen
dc.subjectcollaborationen
dc.subjectscreenwritingen
dc.subjectfranchiseen
dc.subjectStephenie Meyer,en
dc.subjectMelissa Rosenbergen
dc.subjectBill Condonen
dc.subjectP303 Film studiesen
dc.titleFilm adaptation for knowing audiences: analysing fan on-line responses to the end of Breaking Dawn – Part 2 (2012)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalParticipations: Journal of Audience & Reception Studiesen
dc.date.updated2017-12-01T10:08:12Z
dc.description.note"Copyright will always remain with authors, who are free to republish submissions, providing only that a proper acknowledgement of prior publication in Participations (with issue number, date and page numbers) is included. We are happy for work to be placed in institutional repositories or individuals' websites on the same basis of acknowledgement." (http://www.participations.org/submissionguidelines.htm)
html.description.abstractCritics of film adaptations of literary works have historically evaluated the success or failure of the movie on the grounds of its fidelity to the original book. In contrast popular arguments for medium specificity have questioned whether fidelity is possible when adapting one medium to another. This article follows recent academic work which has focused awareness on the processes of adaptation by examining evidence of reading and viewing experience in online and social media forums.      The broader research project explored the online Twilight fan community as an example of a ‘knowing audience’ acquainted with both novel and film. Here we focus on the strong response within fan forums to the surprise ending of the final film adaptation Breaking Dawn – Part 2 (2012). The research uses the forum, blog and facebook page as sites for evidence of reading experience as defined by the Reading Experience Database (RED). The analysis sheds new light on the tensions that exist between fidelity and deviation and the article positions fan audiences as intensive readers who gained unexpected pleasure from a deviation from a canon. It argues that fans are also collaborators within the adaptation process who respect authorial authority and discuss the author’s, scriptwriter’s and director’s interpretation of the novel for the screen. The research identifies the creative and commercial advantages to be gained from a collaborative and open dialogue between adaptors and fans.  Keywords: Adaptation, fandom, online fan communities, Twilight, reading experience, film, audiences, fidelity, canon, collaboration, screenwriting, franchise, Stephenie Meyer, Melissa Rosenberg, Bill Condon


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
PearceWeedonTwilightAdaptation ...
Size:
886.7Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/