• '5,000 feet is the best’: drone warfare, targets and Paul Virilio’s ‘accident’

      Piotrowska, Agnieszka (Edinburgh University Press, 2017-02-01)
    • Activating media, memory and resistances: Where were you in 1992?

      Egbe, Amanda; Novakovic, Rastko (2018-07-04)
      This paper will bring to the fore the resisting character of moving image materials situated as tactical and strategic, through their activation by archival and media practices. Where Were You in 1992? is a multi-platform time-based project that contends with the technologies and practices of activism. Starting from the anti-racist struggle in the UK and the resistance to ethno-nationalism in Yugoslavia, it explores the legacy of European 'liberalism', ‘multiculturalism’ and ‘social cohesion’. It contrasts these with notions of solidarity, anti-racism, and anti-authoritarianism. It gathers hitherto unseen or forgotten testimonies, still and moving images, minutes, leaflets, banners and working notes from individuals and organisations. The project uses the open source archive and notation platform pan.do/ra, and an archive established at the MayDay Rooms archive in London. The paper is concerned with how to mobilise audio-visual materials, testimony and metadata to investigate a global historical situation and map parallels between the social spaces of grassroots activism of the 1990s. Specifically the paper will focus on how specific moments of differing scale, such as the shift between analogue and digital (longue durée) on one hand, and the subjective description of political actions (historical events) on the other hand can be brought together in montage.
    • Analog and digital terrestrial radio standards

      Hallett, Lawrie; Salek, S. (Routledge / Focal Press / NAB, 2017-01-08)
      An overview of US and International broadcast standards, with particular reference to digital planning and transmission standards.
    • Animating film theory [book review]

      Egbe, Amanda (MIT Press - Journals, 2015-05-18)
      Review of 'Animating Film Theory' edited by Karen Beckman. Duke University Press, Durham, NC, 2014. 376 pp., illus. ISBN: 9780822356523.
    • Apples and oranges - duplicating existing FM coverage with DAB.

      Hallett, Lawrie (Taylor & Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles - no Open Select, 2017-05-08)
      This article explores recent developments in the technical regulation and licensing of digital radio services.. It examines issues of coverage, focusing particularly on emergent low-power “small-scale” DAB services as currently being evaluated by Ofcom, the UK broadcast radio regulator. Beginning with an explanation of the technical differences between analogue FM compared to DAB and considering the implications of the differing frequencies used by the two standards, the article concentrates on recently developed approaches to the provision DAB transmission facilities suitable for use by small-scale broadcasters.
    • Audience transformations : shifting audience positions in late modernity

      Hallett, Lawrie; Carpentier, Nico; Schrøder, Kim Christian (Routledge, 2013-09-12)
      The concept of the audience is changing. In the twenty-first century there are novel configurations of user practices and technological capabilities that are altering the way we understand and trust media organisations and representations, how we participate in society, and how we construct our social relations. This book embeds these transformations in a societal, cultural, technological, ideological, economic and historical context, avoiding a naive privileging of technology as the main societal driving force, but also avoiding the media-centric reduction of society to the audiences that are situated within. Audience Transformations provides a platform for a nuanced and careful analysis of the main changes in European communicational practices, and their social, cultural and technological affordances.
    • Avant garde museology [book review]

      Egbe, Amanda (MIT Press - Journals, 2017-04-06)
      Review of 'Avant Garde Museology' edited by Arseny Zhilyaev. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, MN, 2015. 576 pp., illus. Paper. ISBN: 9780816699193.
    • Between copyright and creativity: Edison’s kinetoscope and technological innovations in optical printing

      Egbe, Amanda (Oxford University Press, 2020-03-17)
      Focusing on Edison’s early cinematic apparatus and the optical printer, this chapter explores how copyright law intersects with creativity, providing an alternative to teleological accounts of moving-image technologies. Thomas Edison attempted to control the film industry through patents and copyright. Edison’s first film experiments were registered as a series of photographs on card by his assistant, W. L. Dickson. In protecting these contact copies as paper prints with copyright, the new medium of motion pictures was being formalized. The necessity to duplicate film to support the development of exhibition and distribution was also necessary for copyright purposes. An archaeological approach is utilized to explore how paper prints enabled innovation in the area of the optical printer, a primary form of duplication in cinema. In developing approaches that could bring to life the remaining examples of early cinema, novel solutions in the form of innovations were required. The overlapping concerns of the copyright clerk, the film entrepreneur, and the film historian thus provide a basis for new materials and new innovations in moving-image technology and film history.
    • Black and white: cinema, politics and the arts in Zimbabwe

      Piotrowska, Agnieszka (Routledge, 2016-10-04)
      In Black and White Agnieszka Piotrowska presents a unique insight into the contemporary arts scene in Zimbabwe – an area that has received very limited coverage in research and the media. The book combines theory with literature, film, politics and culture and takes a psychosocial and psychoanalytic perspective to achieve a truly interdisciplinary analysis. Piotrowska focuses in particular on the Harare International Festival of the Arts (HIFA) as well as the cinema, featuring the work of Rumbi Katedza and Joe Njagu. Her personal experience of time spent in Harare, working in collaborative relationships with Zimbabwean artists and filmmakers, informs the book throughout. It features examples of their creative work on the ground and examines the impact it has had on the community and the local media. Piotrowska uses her experiences to analyse concepts of trauma and post-colonialism in Zimbabwe and interrogates her position as a stranger there, questioning patriarchal notions of belonging and authority. Black and White also presents a different perspective on convergences in the work of Doris Lessing and iconic Zimbabwean writer Dambudzo Marechera, and how it might be relevant to contemporary race relations. Black and White will be intriguing reading for psychoanalysts, psychotherapists and psychotherapeutically engaged scholars, film makers, academics and students of post-colonial studies, film studies, cultural studies, psychosocial studies and applied philosophy.
    • Book review: Love, mortality and the moving image

      Piotrowska, Agnieszka (Taylor & Francis, 2014-06-18)
      Review of Wison, E. "Love, mortality and the moving image", Palgrave Macmillan: 2012 9780230308398
    • Book review: The Arab-Israeli Conflict in the Arab Press: The First Three Decades

      Mellor, Noha (Middle East Institute, 2019-12-01)
      Book review of: The Arab-Israeli Conflict in the Arab Press: The First Three Decades By William W. Haddad Intellect Books 9781783209101
    • Book review: The Muslim brotherhood and the west. A history of enmity and engagement

      Mellor, Noha; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor & Francis, 2019-03-27)
      Review of The Muslim brotherhood and the west. A history of enmity and engagement, by Martyn Frampton, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press, 2018, 661pp., £25.95 (hardcover), ISBN: 9780674970700
    • Books and other media

      Weedon, Alexis (Cambridge University Press, 2019-06-05)
      This chapter tells how in the twentieth century it was to the book industry that the film, radio, television and later media industries turned for stories, scripts, ideas, formats and all forms of creative content. The visual culture which arose in the nineteenth century became the inspiration for the new industries. Graphic magazines with their lithographs and etchings were the first visualisations of characters and storyline and sometimes formed the source material for the mis-en-scene of the silent movies. The new developments in radio, film and tlevision opened up larger audiences for authors and added to their potential revenue streams.  As subsidiary rights proliferated through the growth of new media formats, authors set up companies to control and exploit their intellectual properties.  While the BBC sought to avoid direct competition with the book trade, the trend in other media companies though the century was through acquisition to exploit its content across media. So the electronic media appropriated the book’s core values taking access to education, information, and entertainment beyond the walls of the library or schoolroom into the living room as the television set, and then the personal computer, entered the home. Yet the book retained its status and at the end of the century book publishing in Britain remained an essential part of an interconnected communications system for the commodification of ideas and cultural expressions.
    • Cats, convicts and clerics : how the media and politicians have framed the Human Rights Act

      Silverman, Jon (Peter Lang, 2013-01-01)
      The chapter deals with a number of related episodes in which the media - tabloid and broadsheet newspapers - colluded with ministers to 'demonise' the Human Rights Act as part of a longer-term objective of de-legitimizing the UK's membership of the European Union. It takes a number of case studies to argue that a deliberate conflation of the HRA and European Court of Human Rights with the policies of the European Union helped breed support for an anti-EU agenda in UK public policy.
    • The Cinemembrane

      Egbe, Amanda; Novakovic, Rastko (2016-05-02)
      THE CINE-MEMBRANE I: Whither Cinema? At present the space for cinematic exhibition has been colonised as a space for entertainment and commercial enterprise, e.g. the loss of independent cinema spaces in the UK. It is utilised to aneasthetise a populace. There are and have been recent examples of radical exhibition and distribution that now call to be extended and constituted as a rapid response to an environment whereby moving image documents, the work of amateurs, citizens, artists must be exhibited, distributed and acted upon as a matter of urgency. These will be joined by materials from various community and specialist archives. II: What is the Cine-membrane? The cine-membrane is the reconstitution of cinematic space, which calls forth a standing committee. The committee constitutes a forum and tribunal to investigate evidence in the form of moving image documents and the experiences of those who form the committee. The cine-membrane becomes the active viewing space, for speech and action to be constituted in light of conscious and unconscious responses to moving images. These responses inspire action in light of subject matters such as the housing crisis, militarism, and social inequalities. They also extend to the call for further works to be produced, exhibited and examined in light of a lack of meaningful expression in the cinematic environment. The cine-membrane can be mobile, set up anywhere with the use of borrowed equipment. Inside or outside spaces can be cannibalised for the purpose of calling forth the standing committee. The cine-membrane can be fixed, reclaiming and repurposing cinematic and theatrical spaces that sit within a community or the heart of an action called for in light of the moving image documents that are to be considered by the standing committee. III: Permeable spaces The cine-membrane constitutes the fluid space in which moving image documents resonate amongst us. This space makes speech and action possible. It understands that moving images are constructed, that the process and production of that construction must form part of the active evidence that is presented. This is how we build an active understanding and knowledge of the processes by which the moving image comes to have meaning and is accepted as being significant. Content, production and exhibition cannot be separated into discrete entities. Social space, the spaces of cinematic production and distribution are all permeable and come to coexist in the cinemembrane.
    • The Cinemembrane

      Egbe, Amanda; Novakovic, Rastko (2016-05-02)
      I: Whither Cinema? At present the space for cinematic exhibition has been colonised as a space for entertainment and commercial enterprise, e.g. the loss of independent cinema spaces in the UK. It is utilised to aneasthetise a populace. There are and have been recent examples of radical exhibition and distribution that now call to be extended and constituted as a rapid response to an environment whereby moving image documents, the work of amateurs, citizens, artists must be exhibited, distributed and acted upon as a matter of urgency. These will be joined by materials from various community and specialist archives. II: What is the Cine-membrane? The cine-membrane is the reconstitution of cinematic space, which calls forth a standing committee. The committee constitutes a forum and tribunal to investigate evidence in the form of moving image documents and the experiences of those who form the committee. The cine-membrane becomes the active viewing space, for speech and action to be constituted in light of conscious and unconscious responses to moving images. These responses inspire action in light of subject matters such as the housing crisis, militarism, and social inequalities. They also extend to the call for further works to be produced, exhibited and examined in light of a lack of meaningful expression in the cinematic environment. The cine-membrane can be mobile, set up anywhere with the use of borrowed equipment. Inside or outside spaces can be cannibalised for the purpose of calling forth the standing committee. The cine-membrane can be fixed, reclaiming and repurposing cinematic and theatrical spaces that sit within a community or the heart of an action called for in light of the moving image documents that are to be considered by the standing committee. III: Permeable spaces The cine-membrane constitutes the fluid space in which moving image documents resonate amongst us. This space makes speech and action possible. It understands that moving images are constructed, that the process and production of that construction must form part of the active evidence that is presented. This is how we build an active understanding and knowledge of the processes by which the moving image comes to have meaning and is accepted as being significant. Content, production and exhibition cannot be separated into discrete entities. Social space, the spaces of cinematic production and distribution are all permeable and come to coexist in the cinemembrane.
    • Community radio and digital delivery systems

      Hallett, Lawrie (Mediact, 2008-06-01)
    • Community radio in transition : the challenge of digital migration

      Hallett, Lawrie (Intellect, 2008-01-01)
      Radio, the oldest form of electronic broadcasting, has been described as the last medium to go digital. Yet developments have been underway for over twenty years to create new technologies and digital platforms for the transmission of radio in digital form. Drawing upon extensive cross-national research conducted by the Digital Radio Cultures in Europe research group, this volume offers the first comprehensive review of the complex environment in which European digital radio now operates. The title describes the technologies, policies and different strategies utilized to bring radio into the digital era. O’Neill and his co-editors present detailed studies of the development of Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB), successes and failures in digital radio implementation, and future scenarios for radio in a fully converged media environment. Essays address the fact that radio now stands at a crossroads in its development, and question whether the medium has a viable future or whether it will converge with other forms of multimedia and audiovisual media services. Digital Radio in Europe provides an accessible introduction for the student, researcher and practitioner to the technologies and policies for digital radio broadcasting in both a European and global context.