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dc.contributor.authorMacaro, Ernestoen
dc.contributor.authorNakatani, Yasuoen
dc.contributor.authorHayashi, Yukoen
dc.contributor.authorKhabbazbashi, Nahalen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-07T12:41:57Z
dc.date.available2017-11-07T12:41:57Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-27
dc.identifier.citationMacaro E, Nakatani Y, Hayashi Y, Khabbazbashi N (2014) 'Exploring the value of bilingual language assistants with Japanese English as a foreign language learners', Language learning journal, 42 (1), pp.41-54.en
dc.identifier.issn0957-1736
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09571736.2012.678275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622342
dc.description.abstractWe report on a small-scale exploratory study of Japanese students’ reactions to the use of a bilingual language assistant on an EFL study-abroad course in the UK and we give an insight into the possible effect of using bilingual assistants on speaking production. First-year university students were divided into three groups all taught by a monolingual (native) speaker of English. Two teachers had monolingual assistants to help them; the third group had a bilingual (Japanese–English) assistant. In the third group, students were encouraged to ask the assistant for help with English meanings and to provide English equivalents for Japanese phrases, especially during student-centred activities. Moreover, the students in the third group were encouraged to code-switch rather than speak hesitantly or clam up in English. In the first two groups, the students were actively discouraged from using Japanese among themselves in the classroom. The data from an open-ended questionnaire suggest that attitudes to having a bilingual assistant were generally positive. Moreover the ‘bilingual’ group made the biggest gains over the three week period in fluency and in overall speaking scores although these gains were not statistically significant. Suggestions for further research are explored particularly in relation to whether a bilingual assistant may provide support with the cross-cultural challenges faced by EFL learners.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09571736.2012.678275en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.subjectEnglish language assessmenten
dc.subjectlanguage assessmenten
dc.subjectJapanen
dc.subjectX162 Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)en
dc.titleExploring the value of bilingual language assistants with Japanese English as a foreign language learnersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1753-2167
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Oxforden
dc.contributor.departmentHosei Universityen
dc.identifier.journalLanguage learning journalen
dc.date.updated2017-11-07T12:32:27Z
dc.description.noteFile is publishers pdf so not permitted - pre april 2016 so passing metadata only RVO 7/11/17
html.description.abstractWe report on a small-scale exploratory study of Japanese students’ reactions to the use of a bilingual language assistant on an EFL study-abroad course in the UK and we give an insight into the possible effect of using bilingual assistants on speaking production. First-year university students were divided into three groups all taught by a monolingual (native) speaker of English. Two teachers had monolingual assistants to help them; the third group had a bilingual (Japanese–English) assistant. In the third group, students were encouraged to ask the assistant for help with English meanings and to provide English equivalents for Japanese phrases, especially during student-centred activities. Moreover, the students in the third group were encouraged to code-switch rather than speak hesitantly or clam up in English. In the first two groups, the students were actively discouraged from using Japanese among themselves in the classroom. The data from an open-ended questionnaire suggest that attitudes to having a bilingual assistant were generally positive. Moreover the ‘bilingual’ group made the biggest gains over the three week period in fluency and in overall speaking scores although these gains were not statistically significant. Suggestions for further research are explored particularly in relation to whether a bilingual assistant may provide support with the cross-cultural challenges faced by EFL learners.


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