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dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Sean J.en
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Joanna C.en
dc.contributor.authorNixon, Daniel G.D.en
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Lewis J.en
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Iain M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-11T14:08:39Z
dc.date.available2017-04-11T14:08:39Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-30
dc.identifier.citationMaloney SJ, Richards J, Nixon DGD, Harvey LJ, Fletcher IM (2016) 'Do stiffness and asymmetries predict change of direction performance?', Journal of Sports Sciences, 35 (6), pp.547-556.en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414
dc.identifier.pmid27133586
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640414.2016.1179775
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622079
dc.description.abstractChange of direction speed (CODS) underpins performance in a wide range of sports but little is known about how stiffness and asymmetries affect CODS. Eighteen healthy males performed unilateral drop jumps to determine vertical, ankle, knee and hip stiffness, and a CODS test to evaluate left and right leg cutting performance during which ground reaction force data were sampled. A step-wise regression analysis was performed to ascertain the determinants of CODS time. A two-variable regression model explained 63% (R-2 = 0.63; P = 0.001) of CODS performance. The model included the mean vertical stiffness and jump height asymmetry determined during the drop jump. Faster athletes (n = 9) exhibited greater vertical stiffness (F = 12.40; P = 0.001) and less asymmetry in drop jump height (F = 6.02; P = 0.026) than slower athletes (n = 9); effect sizes were both "large" in magnitude. Results suggest that overall vertical stiffness and drop jump height asymmetry are the strongest predictors of CODS in a healthy, non-athletic population.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTAYLOR & FRANCIS LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2016.1179775?journalCode=rjsp20en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcuttingen
dc.subjectagilityen
dc.subjectleg-spring behaviouren
dc.subjectspring-mass modelen
dc.subjecttorsional spring modelen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.titleDo stiffness and asymmetries predict change of direction performance?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
dc.date.updated2017-04-11T13:47:41Z
html.description.abstractChange of direction speed (CODS) underpins performance in a wide range of sports but little is known about how stiffness and asymmetries affect CODS. Eighteen healthy males performed unilateral drop jumps to determine vertical, ankle, knee and hip stiffness, and a CODS test to evaluate left and right leg cutting performance during which ground reaction force data were sampled. A step-wise regression analysis was performed to ascertain the determinants of CODS time. A two-variable regression model explained 63% (R-2 = 0.63; P = 0.001) of CODS performance. The model included the mean vertical stiffness and jump height asymmetry determined during the drop jump. Faster athletes (n = 9) exhibited greater vertical stiffness (F = 12.40; P = 0.001) and less asymmetry in drop jump height (F = 6.02; P = 0.026) than slower athletes (n = 9); effect sizes were both "large" in magnitude. Results suggest that overall vertical stiffness and drop jump height asymmetry are the strongest predictors of CODS in a healthy, non-athletic population.


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