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dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Sean J.en
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Joanna C.en
dc.contributor.authorNixon, Daniel G.D.en
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Lewis J.en
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Iain M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-11T14:08:25Z
dc.date.available2017-04-11T14:08:25Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-31
dc.identifier.citationMaloney SJ, Richards J, Nixon DGC, Harvey LJ, Fletcher IM (2016) 'Vertical stiffness asymmetries during drop jumping are related to ankle stiffness asymmetries', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports 27 (6) 661-669.en
dc.identifier.issn0905-7188
dc.identifier.pmid27037793
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/sms.12682
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622076
dc.description.abstractAsymmetry in vertical stiffness has been associated with increased injury incidence and impaired performance. The determinants of vertical stiffness asymmetry have not been previously investigated. Eighteen healthy males performed three unilateral drop jumps during which vertical stiffness and joint stiffness of the ankle and knee were calculated. Reactive strength index was also determined during the jumps using the ratio of flight time to ground contact time. ‘Moderate’ differences in vertical stiffness (t17 = 5.49; P < 0.001), ‘small’ differences in centre of mass displacement (t17 = -2.19; P = 0.043) and ‘trivial’ differences in ankle stiffness (t17 = 2.68; P = 0.016) were observed between stiff and compliant limbs. A model including ankle stiffness and reactive strength index symmetry angles explained 79% of the variance in vertical stiffness asymmetry (R2 = 0.79; P < 0.001). None of the symmetry angles were correlated to jump height or reactive strength index. Results suggest that asymmetries in ankle stiffness may play an important role in modulating vertical stiffness asymmetry in recreationally trained males.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1111/sms.12682/fullen
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectleg-spring behaviouren
dc.subjectcentre of mass displacementen
dc.subjectspring-mass modelen
dc.subjecttorsional spring modelen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.titleVertical stiffness asymmetries during drop jumping are related to ankle stiffness asymmetriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sportsen
dc.date.updated2017-04-11T13:47:45Z
html.description.abstractAsymmetry in vertical stiffness has been associated with increased injury incidence and impaired performance. The determinants of vertical stiffness asymmetry have not been previously investigated. Eighteen healthy males performed three unilateral drop jumps during which vertical stiffness and joint stiffness of the ankle and knee were calculated. Reactive strength index was also determined during the jumps using the ratio of flight time to ground contact time. ‘Moderate’ differences in vertical stiffness (t17 = 5.49; P < 0.001), ‘small’ differences in centre of mass displacement (t17 = -2.19; P = 0.043) and ‘trivial’ differences in ankle stiffness (t17 = 2.68; P = 0.016) were observed between stiff and compliant limbs. A model including ankle stiffness and reactive strength index symmetry angles explained 79% of the variance in vertical stiffness asymmetry (R2 = 0.79; P < 0.001). None of the symmetry angles were correlated to jump height or reactive strength index. Results suggest that asymmetries in ankle stiffness may play an important role in modulating vertical stiffness asymmetry in recreationally trained males.


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