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dc.contributor.authorSpence, Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Marken
dc.contributor.authorBeard, Colinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-10T14:23:32Z
dc.date.available2016-11-10T14:23:32Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.identifier.citationSpence, S., Hickman, M., Beard, C. (2016) 'Gaining perceptions of intelligence in order to understand how knowledge exists in the post-16 sport curriculum'. Journal of pedagogic development 6 (3).en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621823
dc.description.abstractThis study focused on discovering how intelligence was conceptualised by Further Education (FE) sport and access students in order to offer suggestions of what this means for how knowledge is perceived in the post-16 sports curriculum. A small scale qualitative methodology was used where a questionnaire was created to collect data and answer the two research questions devised. Non-probability quota sampling was used to represent characteristics (strata) of the greater population. Results indicated that the professions based on highly academic and theoretical aspects were viewed as more intelligent with the greatest differential of perceived intellect evident in the profession of a doctor and football player. The study offers a concerned outlook as where that leaves the post-16 sports curriculum when intelligence is not perceived in the same way in that environment. Consequentially questions arise for the role of post-16 sport as a subject in its own right especially following recent policy changes that only heighten the importance of subjects such as English and maths in the sector. Future research should look at what intelligence is in these practical environments and focus on assessing the current curriculum to make sure that sport is viewed as more than ‘good for teamwork, good for health’, as although this is true it just highlights that the learning of knowledge is secondary in this subject and highlights the misconceptions of perceived practical performance subjects.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/343en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsporten
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectintelligenceen
dc.subjectlearningen
dc.subjectknowledgeen
dc.subjectunderstandingen
dc.subjectcurriculumen
dc.titleGaining perceptions of intelligence in order to understand how knowledge exists in the post-16 sport curriculumen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
html.description.abstractThis study focused on discovering how intelligence was conceptualised by Further Education (FE) sport and access students in order to offer suggestions of what this means for how knowledge is perceived in the post-16 sports curriculum. A small scale qualitative methodology was used where a questionnaire was created to collect data and answer the two research questions devised. Non-probability quota sampling was used to represent characteristics (strata) of the greater population. Results indicated that the professions based on highly academic and theoretical aspects were viewed as more intelligent with the greatest differential of perceived intellect evident in the profession of a doctor and football player. The study offers a concerned outlook as where that leaves the post-16 sports curriculum when intelligence is not perceived in the same way in that environment. Consequentially questions arise for the role of post-16 sport as a subject in its own right especially following recent policy changes that only heighten the importance of subjects such as English and maths in the sector. Future research should look at what intelligence is in these practical environments and focus on assessing the current curriculum to make sure that sport is viewed as more than ‘good for teamwork, good for health’, as although this is true it just highlights that the learning of knowledge is secondary in this subject and highlights the misconceptions of perceived practical performance subjects.


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