• The Dorothy Sharp project : shifting embodied identities

      Carr, Jane; Sharp, Bruce (2016-07-30)
      Interactive performance installation. Working with the artist Bruce Sharp, we have devised a workshop/performance installation that aims to facilitate short explorations of embodied identities.We consider that posture, gesture and action can be thought of as providing tools to explore issues of identity, gender and sexualities as (re)presented to others through the performative actions of the subject. The work  interrogatse (un)conscious kinaesthetic choices made by the conventional binary identified that can be opened up to flux by a fluid non-binary identified subject. The work thus aims to provide tools for reflecting upon coded movement behaviour and to surface the human capacity to switch fluidly between them by using written prompts/guide/instructions -  a kind of ‘dish’ – as guide for such ‘improvisations’.
    • The Dorothy Sharp Project : the possibilities of different geographies

      Carr, Jane; Sharp, Bruce (2017-04-10)
      A performative installation /workshop that is a development of a series of incarnations of work under the same title that have explored choreographies of basic postures and gestures. Posture, gesture and action can be thought of as providing tools to explore issues of identity, gender and sexualities This performative installation / workshop aims to provide tools for reflecting upon coded movement behaviours and to surface the human capacity to switch fluidly between them by using written prompts/guide/instructions -  a kind of ‘recipe’ – as guide for such ‘improvisations’.  Within a supportive space, aimed at promoting an environment of collective experience, drinks (non-alcoholic)  and nibbles will be on offer to help viewers to acclimatize to the café- like setting in which ‘a la carte’ movement ‘menus’ provide opportunities for participation. Viewers can become participants by selecting a ‘recipe’. After some easily accessible preparation, they enter the performing area to interpret the simple set of instructions (dish) to perform a short (2 minute) movement sequence. Alternatively they can elect to have a helper perform the chosen movement ‘recipe’.  Actions are lit and accompanied by sound as a means of providing for the ‘performance’ to be distanced from everyday experience in order to facilitate a freedom to play with movement without the fear of value judgments that may otherwise  inhibit behaviour. Simple theatre lighting sets the ‘performance’ space - e.g. a conventional profile light shuttered into a shape like rectangle or a circle. The sound score is tailored to each movement recipe: it aims not only to signal when to start and finish but to provide an environment in which everyday movement can be re-experienced.After each short ‘performance‘, there will be an opportunity for guided self -reflection and, if appropriate, a supported feedback process that facilitates the ‘performer’ to ask questions of their audience about how they witnessed their movement. Respondents will be guided to use non evaluative language in order to be supportive of fellow participants.      
    • Mapping lineage: lineage maps by improvisation artists

      Ashley, Tamara (Guildford Street Press, 2018-08-01)
      The Mapping Lineage book documents the artistic lineages of post-modern dance artists. Maps were collected at the Form in Question symposium at New York University in January 2016.
    • Performing reconciliation: Milan and the memory of Piazza Fontana

      Caoduro, Elena; O'Rawe, Des; Phelan, Mark; University of Bedfordshire; Queen's University Belfast (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016-07-29)
      Elena Caoduro’s essay explores the relations between a history of political violence and the function of art with reference to the 1969 Piazza Fontana massacre in Milan. This terrorist attack inaugurated the most violent decade in the history of the Italian republic: the anni di piombo (‘years of lead’), in which Italy experienced waves of social conflict and unprecedented acts of violence carried out by both right- and left-wing paramilitary groups. Caoduro analyses how the city of Milan monumentalises the victims of this massacre and searches for reconciliation between conflicting truths, since the last trial proved inclusive and provided no closure. Drawing on Paul Ricoeur’s seminal Memory, History, and Forgetting (2004), Caoduro attempts to discern when it is right to remember and when it is better to forget, or indeed how much we should remember. Although arguing that cathartic narration can assist national reconciliation, she cautions against political amnesty being accompanied by amnesia.
    • The possibilities of different geographies

      Carr, Jane; Sharp, Bruce (2019-09-20)
      Revision of work presented as part of Dorothy 139
    • Post-colonialism and performance: political, cultural and pedagogic legacies and constraints

      Ukaegbu, Victor (Repertório, Salvador, 2018-03-30)
      Most postcolonial societies continue to bear the scars of European colonialism in their sociocultural, political and pedagogic domains. Neo-colonialist relationships with their erstwhile colonisers continue to affect the historical and material conditions of every postcolonial nationstate to the extent of shaping the synergy between indigenous and foreign cultural systems and how postcolonial societies model their new universes.This essay looks broadly at the state of post-colonialism in the 21st century, it argues that while there are opportunities, postcolonial performance is still subject to Political, Cultural and Pedagogic constraints.