• Barriers and facilitators to adherence to group exercise in institutionalized older people living with dementia: a systematic review

      Vseteckova, Jitka; Deepak-Gopinath, Manik; Borgstrom, Erica; Holland, Caroline; Draper, Jan; Pappas, Yannis; McKeown, Eamonn; Dadova, Klara; Gray, Steve; Open University; et al. (BioMed Central, 2018-12-28)
      Research suggests targeted exercise is important for people living with dementia, especially those living in residential care. The aim of this review was to collect and synthesize evidence on the known barriers and facilitators to adherence to group exercise of institutionalized older people living with dementia. We searched all available electronic databases. Additionally, we searched trial registries (clinicaltrial.gov, and WHO ICTRP) for ongoing studies. We searched for and included papers from January 1990 until September 2017 in any language. We included randomized, non-randomized trials. Studies were not eligible if participants were either healthy older people or people suffering from dementia but not living in an institution. Studies were also excluded if they were not focused on barriers and facilitators to adherence to group exercise. Using narrative analysis, we identified the following themes for barriers: bio-medical reasons and mental wellbeing and physical ability, relationships dynamics, and socioeconomic reasons. The facilitators were grouped under the following thematic frames: bio-medical benefits and benefits related to physical ability, feelings and emotions and confidence improvements, therapist and group relationships dynamics and activity related reasons. We conclude that institutionalized older people living with dementia, even those who are physically frail, incontinent and/or have mild dementia can demonstrate certain level of exercise adherence, and therefore can respond positively to exercise programs. Tailored, individually-adjusted and supported physical activity, led by a knowledgeable, engaging and well communicating therapist/facilitator improves the adherence to group exercise interventions of institutionalized older people living with dementia. Objectives Methods Results Conclusions
    • Patient uptake and adherence to social prescribing: a qualitative study

      Pescheny, Julia Vera; Randhawa, Gurch; Pappas, Yannis; University of Bedfordshire (Royal College of General Practitioners, 2018-08-08)
      Social prescription is an initiative that aims to link patients in primary care with sources of support within the community and voluntary sector to improve their health, wellbeing, and care experience. Such programmes usually include navigators, who work with referred patients and issue onward referrals to sources of non-medical support. Most research on social prescribing (SP) has focused on outcome evaluations, resulting in a knowledge gap of factors affecting uptake and adherence. Understanding such factors enables the refinement of programmes, which has the potential to enhance uptake and adherence, reduce health inequalities, and optimise investment. Aim To explore the experiences and views of service users, involved GPs, and navigators on factors influencing uptake and adherence to SP. Design & setting Qualitative interviews were conducted with stakeholders involved in an SP programme in the east of England (Luton). Method Data were collected from semi-structured face-to-face interviews with service users, navigators, and GPs. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Factors affecting uptake and adherence to SP were related to patients’ trust in GPs, navigators' initial phone call, supportive navigators and service providers, free services, and perceived need and benefits. Reported barriers to uptake and adherence were fear of stigma of psychosocial problems, patient expectations, and the short-term nature of the programme. Conclusion This study provides an insight into factors affecting patient uptake and adherence to SP programmes. More research in this field, including patients who refused to participate in SP, is needed. Go to: Social prescription is an initiative that aims to link patients in primary care with sources of support within the community and voluntary sector to improve their health, wellbeing, and care experience. Such programmes usually include navigators, who work with referred patients and issue onward referrals to sources of non-medical support. Most research on social prescribing (SP) has focused on outcome evaluations, resulting in a knowledge gap of factors affecting uptake and adherence. Understanding such factors enables the refinement of programmes, which has the potential to enhance uptake and adherence, reduce health inequalities, and optimise investment. Aim To explore the experiences and views of service users, involved GPs, and navigators on factors influencing uptake and adherence to SP. Design & setting Qualitative interviews were conducted with stakeholders involved in an SP programme in the east of England (Luton). Method Data were collected from semi-structured face-to-face interviews with service users, navigators, and GPs. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Factors affecting uptake and adherence to SP were related to patients’ trust in GPs, navigators' initial phone call, supportive navigators and service providers, free services, and perceived need and benefits. Reported barriers to uptake and adherence were fear of stigma of psychosocial problems, patient expectations, and the short-term nature of the programme. Conclusion This study provides an insight into factors affecting patient uptake and adherence to SP programmes. More research in this field, including patients who refused to participate in SP, is needed.
    • Personalised adherence support for maintenance treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: a tailored digital intervention to change adherence-related beliefs and barriers

      Chapman, Sarah; Sibelli, Alice; St-Clair Jones, Anja; Forbes, Alastair; Chater, Angel M.; Horne, Robert; UCL School of Pharmacy; University of Bath; King’s College London; Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2020-05-07)
      Background and aims: Interventions to improve adherence to medication may be more effective if tailored to the individual, addressing adherence-related beliefs about treatment and overcoming practical barriers to daily use. We evaluated whether an algorithm tailoring support to address perceptual and practical barriers to adherence reduced barriers and was acceptable to patients with IBD. Methods: Participants with IBD, prescribed azathioprine and/or mesalazine were recruited via patient groups, social media and hospital clinics and allocated to Intervention or Control Groups. The online intervention comprised messages tailored to address beliefs about IBD and maintenance treatment and provide advice on overcoming practical difficulties with taking regular medication. The content was personalised to address specific perceptual and practical barriers identified by a pre-screening tool. Validated questionnaires assessed barriers to adherence and related secondary outcomes at baseline, one and three months of follow-up. Results: 329 participants were allocated to the Intervention (n=153) and Control (n=176) Groups; just under half (46.2%) completed follow-up. At one and three months the Intervention Group had significantly fewer concerns about IBD medication (p≤.01); and, at three months only, fewer doubts about treatment need, fewer reported practical barriers and lower nonadherence (p<.05). Relative to controls at follow-up, the Intervention Group were more satisfied with information about IBD medicines, and viewed pharmaceuticals in general more positively. Questionnaires, interviews and intervention usage indicated the intervention was acceptable. Conclusions: Personalised adherence support using a digital algorithm can help patients overcome perceptual (doubts about treatment necessity and medication concerns) and practical barriers to adherence.