• Children, organ donation and Islam

      Aktas, Mikail; Randhawa, Gurch; Brierley, Joe; Durham University; University of Bedfordshire; Great Ormond St Hospital (BMJ Publishing Group, 2019-05-17)
      Although Islamic scholars have debated deceased organ donation many Muslims remain unaware of these debates, or of Islamic rulings on the issue.1 Overall, there has been little public debate about child end-of-life issues, including deceased donation, in any faith groups including the Muslim community. This letter reviews relevant Islamic issues with an aim of stimulating discussion within both the donation and Muslim communities. We hope it can start a process to ensure families have supportive, accurate, empowering information when making donation decisions in their child’s end-of-life care, including understanding consequent effects on others.
    • Interprofessional education in maternity services: is there evidence to support policy?

      Davies, Nigel; Fletcher, Simon; Reeves, Scott; University of Bedfordshire (Taylor and Francis Ltd, 2016-10-05)
      Against a backdrop of poor maternity and obstetric care, identified in the Morecambe Bay Inquiry, the UK government has recently called for improvements and heralded investment in training. Given the complex mix of professionals working closely together in maternity services addressing the lack of joined up continuing professional development (CPD) is necessary. This led us to ask whether there is evidence of IPE in maternity services. As part of a wider systematic review of IPE, we searched for studies related to CPD in maternity services between May 2005 and June 2014. A total of 206 articles were identified with 24 articles included after initial screening. Further review revealed only eight articles related to maternity care, none of which met the inclusion criteria for the main systematic review. The main reasons for non-inclusion included weak evaluation, a focus on undergraduate IPE, and articles referring to paediatric/neonatal care only. Fewer articles were found than anticipated given the number of different professions working together in maternity services. This gap suggests further investigation is warranted.
    • Patient uptake and adherence to social prescribing: a qualitative study

      Pescheny, Julia Vera; Randhawa, Gurch; Pappas, Yannis; University of Bedfordshire (Royal College of General Practitioners, 2018-08-08)
      Social prescription is an initiative that aims to link patients in primary care with sources of support within the community and voluntary sector to improve their health, wellbeing, and care experience. Such programmes usually include navigators, who work with referred patients and issue onward referrals to sources of non-medical support. Most research on social prescribing (SP) has focused on outcome evaluations, resulting in a knowledge gap of factors affecting uptake and adherence. Understanding such factors enables the refinement of programmes, which has the potential to enhance uptake and adherence, reduce health inequalities, and optimise investment. Aim To explore the experiences and views of service users, involved GPs, and navigators on factors influencing uptake and adherence to SP. Design & setting Qualitative interviews were conducted with stakeholders involved in an SP programme in the east of England (Luton). Method Data were collected from semi-structured face-to-face interviews with service users, navigators, and GPs. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Factors affecting uptake and adherence to SP were related to patients’ trust in GPs, navigators' initial phone call, supportive navigators and service providers, free services, and perceived need and benefits. Reported barriers to uptake and adherence were fear of stigma of psychosocial problems, patient expectations, and the short-term nature of the programme. Conclusion This study provides an insight into factors affecting patient uptake and adherence to SP programmes. More research in this field, including patients who refused to participate in SP, is needed. Go to: Social prescription is an initiative that aims to link patients in primary care with sources of support within the community and voluntary sector to improve their health, wellbeing, and care experience. Such programmes usually include navigators, who work with referred patients and issue onward referrals to sources of non-medical support. Most research on social prescribing (SP) has focused on outcome evaluations, resulting in a knowledge gap of factors affecting uptake and adherence. Understanding such factors enables the refinement of programmes, which has the potential to enhance uptake and adherence, reduce health inequalities, and optimise investment. Aim To explore the experiences and views of service users, involved GPs, and navigators on factors influencing uptake and adherence to SP. Design & setting Qualitative interviews were conducted with stakeholders involved in an SP programme in the east of England (Luton). Method Data were collected from semi-structured face-to-face interviews with service users, navigators, and GPs. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Factors affecting uptake and adherence to SP were related to patients’ trust in GPs, navigators' initial phone call, supportive navigators and service providers, free services, and perceived need and benefits. Reported barriers to uptake and adherence were fear of stigma of psychosocial problems, patient expectations, and the short-term nature of the programme. Conclusion This study provides an insight into factors affecting patient uptake and adherence to SP programmes. More research in this field, including patients who refused to participate in SP, is needed.
    • Time, timing, talking and training: findings from an exploratory action research study to improve quality of end of life care for minority ethnic kidney patients

      Wilkinson, Emma; Randhawa, Gurch; Brown, Edwina; Gane, Maria da Silva; Stoves, John; Warwick, Graham; Mir, Tahira; Magee, Regina; Sharman, Sue; Farrington, Ken; et al. (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2017-02-16)
      Background. With an ageing and increasingly diverse population at risk from rising levels of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including kidney complications, there is a need to provide quality care at all stages in the care pathway including at the end of life and to all patients. Aim. This study purposively explored South Asian patients’ experiences of kidney end of life care to understand how services can be delivered in a way that meets diverse patient needs. Methods. Within an action research design 14 focus groups (45 care providers) of kidney care providers discussed the recruitment and analysis of individual interviews with 16 South Asian kidney patients (eight men, eight women). Emergent themes from the focus groups were analysed thematically. The research took place at four UK centres providing kidney care to diverse populations: West London, Luton, Leicester and Bradford. Results. Key themes related to time and the timing of discussions about end of life care and the factors that place limitations on patients and providers in talking about end of life care. Lack of time and confidence of nurses in areas of kidney care, individual attitudes and workforce composition influence whether and how patients have access to end of life care through kidney services. Conclusion. Training, team work and time to discuss overarching issues (including timing and communication about end of life) with colleagues could support service providers to facilitate access and delivery of end of life care to this group of patients.