• Lessons learned from recruiting nursing homes to a quantitative cross-sectional pilot study

      Tzouvara, Vasiliki; Papadopoulos, Chris; Randhawa, Gurch; King’s College London; University of Bedfordshire (RCN Publishing, 2016-03-21)
      Recruitment strategies Previous Next Lessons learned from recruiting nursing homes to a quantitative cross-sectional pilot study Vasiliki Tzouvara Research associate, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London, UK Chris Papadopoulos Senior lecturer, Institute for Health Research, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK Gurch Randhawa Professor of diversity in public health, Institute for Health Research, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, UK Background A growing older adult population is leading to increased admission rates to long-term care facilities such as nursing homes and residential care homes. Assisted healthcare services should be flexible, integrated, and responsive to older adults’ needs. However, there is a limited body of empirical evidence because of the recruitment challenges in these settings. Aim To describe the barriers and challenges faced in recruiting to a recent pilot study, consider previously implemented and proposed recruitment strategies, and propose a new multi-method approach to maximising recruitment of care homes. Discussion The proposed multi-method approach harnesses key recruitment strategies previously highlighted as effective in navigating the many challenges and barriers that are likely to be encountered, such as mistrust, scepticism and concerns about disruption to routines. This includes making strategic use of existing personal and professional connections within the research team, engaging with care homes that have previously engaged with the research process, forming relationships of trust, and employing a range of incentives. Conclusion Implementing carefully planned recruitment strategies is likely to improve relationships between nursing homes and researchers. As a consequence, recruitment can be augmented which can enable the production of rigorous evidence required for achieving effective nursing practice and patient wellbeing.
    • Understanding failings in patient safety: lessons from the case of surgeon Ian Paterson

      Milligan, Frank; University of Bedfordshire (RCN Publishing, 2021-06-01)
      While rare, incidents of inappropriate and/or unnecessary surgery do occur, so effective surveillance of surgical practice is required to ensure patient safety. This article explores the case of Ian Paterson, a consultant surgeon who was sentenced to 20 years in prison in 2017 for wounding with intent and unlawful wounding, primarily by undertaking inappropriate or unnecessary mastectomies. The article details the main points of the Paterson case, with reference to the subsequent government-commissioned inquiry and its recommendations. It also outlines various strategies for enhancing patient safety, including applying human factors theory, improving auditing, and rationalising NHS and private healthcare. The author concludes that nurses have a crucial role in the surveillance of surgical practice and that combined reporting of surgeons' practice across NHS and private healthcare organisations is required.
    • Understanding the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on nurses from ethnic minority backgrounds

      Qureshi, Irtiza; Garcia, Rebecca; Ali, Nasreen; Randhawa, Gurch; University of Bedfordshire; Open University (RCN Publishing, 2021-07-12)
      People from ethnic minority backgrounds in the UK have been disproportionately affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), with higher death rates and suboptimal health outcomes compared with those from white ethnic backgrounds. This trend is reflected in healthcare staff from ethnic minority backgrounds, including nurses, who are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and have higher death rates from the disease. The theory of intersectionality contends that social categorisations such as gender, race and class can contribute to discrimination and result in disadvantages. In this article, the authors outline several intersecting factors that could be contributing to the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 among nurses from ethnic minority backgrounds, as well as making recommendations for further research in this area.