• The discourse of the IELTS Speaking Test : interactional design and practice

      Seedhouse, Paul; Nakatsuhara, Fumiyo (Cambridge University Press, 2018-02-15)
      The volume provides a unique dual perspective on the evaluation of spoken discourse in that it combines a detailed portrayal of the design of a face-to-face speaking test with its actual implementation in interactional terms. Using many empirical extracts of interaction from authentic IELTS Speaking Tests, the book illustrates how the interaction is organised in relation to the institutional aim of ensuring valid assessment. The relationship between individual features of the interaction and grading criteria is examined in detail across a number of different performance levels.
    • Exploring the use of video-conferencing technology in the assessment of spoken language: a mixed-methods study

      Nakatsuhara, Fumiyo; Inoue, Chihiro; Berry, Vivien; Galaczi, Evelina D.; University of Bedfordshire; British Council; Cambridge English Language Assessment (Taylor & Francis, 2017-02-10)
      This research explores how internet-based video-conferencing technology can be used to deliver and conduct a speaking test, and what similarities and differences can be discerned between the standard and computer-mediated face-to-face modes. The context of the study is a high-stakes speaking test, and the motivation for the research is the need for test providers to keep under constant review the extent to which their tests are accessible and fair to a wide constituency of test takers. The study examines test-takers’ scores and linguistic output, and examiners’ test administration and rating behaviors across the two modes. A convergent parallel mixed-methods research design was used, analyzing test-takers’ scores and language functions elicited, examiners’ written comments, feedback questionnaires and verbal reports, as well as observation notes taken by researchers. While the two delivery modes generated similar test score outcomes, some differences were observed in test-takers’ functional output and the behavior of examiners who served as both raters and interlocutors.