• Comparing writing proficiency assessments used in professional medical registration: a methodology to inform policy and practice

      Chan, Sathena Hiu Chong; Taylor, Lynda; University of Bedfordshire (Elsevier, 2020-10-13)
      Internationally trained doctors wishing to register and practise in an English-speaking country typically have to demonstrate that they can communicate effectively in English, including writing proficiency. Various English language proficiency (ELP) tests are available worldwide and are used for such licensing purposes. This means that medical registration bodies face the question of which test(s) will meet their needs, ideally reflecting the demands of their professional environment. This article reports a mixed-methods study to survey the policy and practice of health-care registration organisations in the UK and worldwide. The study aimed to identify ELP tests that were, or could be, considered as suitable for medical registration purposes and to understand the differences between them. The paper discusses what the study revealed about the function and comparability of different writing tests used in professional registration as well as the complex criteria a professional body may prioritise when selecting a test. Although the original study was completed in 2015, the paper takes account of subsequent changes in policy and practice. It offers a practical methodology and worked example which may be of interest and value to other researchers, language testers and policymakers as they face challenges in selecting and making comparisons across tests.
    • Testing four skills in Japan

      Green, Anthony; University of Bedfordshire (Japan Society of English Language Education, 2016-02-01)
      This paper considers arguments for the testing of spoken language skills in Japan and the contribution the use of such tests might make to language education. The Japanese government, recognising the importance of spontaneous social interaction in English to participation in regional and global communities, mandates the development of all ‘four skills’ (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking) in schools. However, university entrance tests continue to emphasize the written language. Because they control access to opportunities, entrance tests tend to dominate teaching and learning. They are widely believed to encourage traditional forms of teaching and to inhibit speaking and listening activities in the classroom. Comprehensive testing of spoken language skills should, in contrast, encourage (or at least not discourage) the teaching and learning of these skills. On the other hand, testing spoken language skills also represents a substantial challenge. New organisational structures are needed to support new testing formats and these will be unfamiliar to all involved, resulting in an increased risk of system failures. Introducing radical change to any educational system is likely to provoke a reaction from those who benefit most from the status quo. For this reason, critics will be ready to exploit any perceived shortcomings to reverse innovative policies. Experience suggests that radical changes in approaches to testing are unlikely to deliver benefits for the education system unless they are well supported by teacher training, new materials and public relations initiatives. The introduction of spoken language tests is no doubt essential to the success of Japan’s language policies, but is not without risk and needs to be carefully integrated with other aspects of the education system.