• Are current academic reading tests fit for purpose?

      Weir, Cyril J.; Chan, Sathena Hiu Chong; University of Bedfordshire (2018-03-14)
    • Research and practice in assessing academic reading: the case of IELTS

      Weir, Cyril J.; Chan, Sathena Hiu Chong (Cambridge University Press, 2019-08-29)
      The focus for attention in this volume is the reading component of the IELTS Academic module, which is principally used for admissions purposes into ter- tiary-level institutions throughout the world (see Davies 2008 for a detailed history of the developments in EAP testing leading up to the current IELTS). According to the official website (www.cambridgeenglish.org/exams-and- tests/ielts/test-format/), there are three reading passages in the Academic Reading Module with a total of c.2,150–2,750 words. Individual tasks are not timed. Texts are taken from journals, magazines, books, and newspapers. All the topics are of general interest and the texts have been written for a non-specialist audience. The readings are intended to be about issues that are appropriate to candidates who will enter postgraduate or undergraduate courses. At least one text will contain detailed logical argument. One of the texts may contain non-verbal materials such as graphs, illustrations or diagrams. If there are technical terms, which candidates may not know in the text, then a glossary is provided. The texts and questions become more difficult through the paper. A number of specific critical questions are addressed in applying the socio- cognitive validation framework to the IELTS Academic Reading Module: * Are the cognitive processes required to complete the IELTS Reading test tasks appropriate and adequate in their coverage? (Focus on cognitive validity in Chapter 4.) * Are the contextual characteristics of the test tasks and their administration appropriate and fair to the candidates who are taking them? (Focus on context validity in Chapter 5.) * What effects do the test and test scores have on various stakeholders? (Focus on consequential validity in Chapter 6.) * What external evidence is there that the test is fair? (Focus on criterion- related validity in Chapter 7.)