• Behavioural science and disease prevention: psychological guidance.

      Chater, Angel M.; Arden, Maddy; Armitage, Chris; Byrne-Davis, Lucie; Chadwick, Paul; Drury, John; Hart, Jo; Lewis, Lesley; McBride, Emily; Perriard-Abdoh, Saskia; et al. (British Psychological Society, 2020-04-14)
      Psychology is crucial to reducing the spread of Covid-19 as it enables us to understand and change behaviour and anticipate people’s responses to changes in policy and guidelines. Behaviours are key to preventing infection and improving outcomes.
    • Health psychology, behavioural science, and Covid-19 disease prevention

      Chater, Angel M.; Whittaker, Ellie; Lewis, Lesley; Arden, Madelynne A.; Byrne-Davis, Lucie; Chadwick, Paul; Drury, John; Epton, Tracy; Hart, Jo; Kamal, Atiya; et al. (British Psychological Society, 2021-02-02)
      ‘This is a pre-publication version of the following article: [Chater A, Whittaker E, Lewis L, Arden MA, Byrne-Davis L, Chadwick P, Drury J, Epton T, Hart J, Kamal A, McBride E, O'Connor D, Shorter G, Swanson V, Armitage C (2021) 'Health psychology, behavioural science, and Covid-19 disease prevention', Health Psychology Update, (in press).]’ In March 2020 the president of the British Psychological Society (BPS) reached out to member networks to join forces on a BPS COVID-19 co-ordinating group. Members of this group were tasked to lead different work-streams highlighting psychology’s role during the pandemic. One work-stream focused on ‘Behavioural Science and Disease Prevention’. It was clear that understanding behaviour and anticipating public responses to changes in policies, public messaging and guidelines would be key to improving health outcomes. This work-stream focused on developing clear guidance to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and identifying psychological evidence to promote best practice in the design of sustainable behavioural interventions. This includes both immediate infection control behaviours aimed at reducing virus transmission, such as hand washing, physical-distancing and self-isolation, and behaviours that may have been influenced during the pandemic, such as physical activity, eating behaviour, substance use and healthcare use, which will have far reaching impacts on future health. This article provides an overview of the core guidance and practical examples of its application in a public health setting.
    • A healthy contribution

      Johnston, Marie; Weinman, John; Chater, Angel M. (British Psychological Society, 2011-12-31)
      Marie Johnston, John Weinman and Angel Chater introduce a special feature to mark the founding of the Society’s Health Psychology Section 25 years ago
    • Let’s talk about death openly: when the world is grieving, please don’t walk on eggshells.

      Chater, Angel M.; University of Bedfordshire (British Psychological Society, 2020-05-13)
      A blog on bereavement and physical activity Health Psychologist Angel Chater has spoken openly about bereavement over the last two decades. Here, she urges society to recognise and be open about loss.
    • Psychological perspectives on obesity: addressing policy, practice and research priorities

      Perriard-Abdoh, Saskia; Chadwick, Paul; Chater, Angel M.; Chisolm, A.; Doyle, J.; Gillison, Fiona B.; Greaves, C.; Liardet, Joseph; Llewellyn, Clare; McKenna, I.; et al. (British Psychological Society, 2019-09-16)
      Obesity has received much attention from politicians, policymakers, healthcare professionals, the media and the public over the past few decades. Since the formal recognition from the UK government in 1991 that obesity was a sufficient threat to the health of the nation, a targeted response to address the issue has been a policy priority for almost 30 years. A wide range of policies are now in place, including the establishment of nutritional standards in schools, programmes aimed to boost physical activity, and weight management services. However, while some interventions and services have been successful at the individual and community level, there has been little impact at population level. This report looks at what psychological evidence and perspectives can add to help improve our combined response to obesity. It seeks to guide professionals and policy-makers who are working with individuals, groups and populations that are impacted by obesity to take an approach that is guided by psychology. We have sought to produce guidance that recognises and builds on existing services, while identifying areas where further resources, standards, training and staff are required
    • Psychology as a thing of the past

      Chater, Angel M. (British Psychological Society, 2020-08-31)
      Prof-bots or a psychologically informed future? You decide, says Angel Chater.
    • Reflecting on the Stage 2 Health Psychology independent training route: a survey of trainee and graduate experiences of employability

      Bull, Eleanor; Newman, Kristina; Cassidy, Tony; Anderson, Niall; Chater, Angel M. (British Psychological Society, 2021-02-02)
      ‘This is a pre-publication version of the following article: [Bull E, Newman K, Cassidy T, Anderson N, Chater A (2020) 'Reflecting on the Stage 2 Health Psychology independent training route: a survey of trainee and graduate experiences of employability', Health Psychology Update, (in press).]’ A couple of the most common questions we may encounter from psychology students thinking about their career choices are: “What roles are there in health psychology?” and “How do I become a health psychologist?” Our discipline has made many advances into diverse spheres of employment, which then often leads to a response: “How long have you got?!” Health psychologists offer their knowledge and skills in psychological intervention, research, training and consultancy to improve health and wellbeing in a wealth of different settings, working at all levels from one-to-one with patients/clients/healthcare professionals, to groups, whole communities and populations. An increasingly wide range of stakeholders are recognising that they may benefit from collaborating with and employing a Health Psychologist, with Health Psychologists working in health and social care, education, culture, justice, and military, as well as working within global health partnerships through volunteering collaboratives (e.g. Byrne-Davis et al. 2017). The development of the Health Psychology and Public Health Network (HPPHN: Chater, 2014; McManus, 2014; Chater & McManus, 2016; renamed the Behavioural Science and Public Health Network, BSPHN in 2018) is also importantly strengthening our links with public health colleagues and creating new opportunities. Recent initiatives have also had success in raising the profile of Health Psychologists working in diverse areas, nationally and internationally. Some of these include Health Psychology Update’s new ‘Teaching, training and consultancy’ section (Cross, 2020), accounts of trainees’ experiences (e.g. Smith, 2018), the British Psychological Society (BPS) Division of Health Psychology’s (DHP) social media hashtag #DayInLifeOfHealthPsychology, the Oral History of UK Health Psychology project (Quinn, Morrison & Chater, 2020) and the BPS DHP Scotland’s case studies of Health Psychologists. Reflecting this diversity, in the UK there are currently several different options for training in health psychology.