• Acute effect of breakfast glycaemic index and breaking up prolonged sitting on postprandial glucose and insulin in adult males

      Maylor, Benjamin D.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Orton, Charlie J.; Bailey, Daniel Paul (2015-11-20)
    • Association between breakfast frequency and physical activity and sedentary time: a cross-sectional study in children from 12 countries

      Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Gillison, Fiona B.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Mire, Emily F.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Denstel, Kara D.; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; et al. (BMC, 2019-02-21)
      Background: Existing research has documented inconsistent findings for the associations among breakfast frequency, physical activity (PA), and sedentary time in children. The primary aim of this study was to examine the associations among breakfast frequency and objectively-measured PA and sedentary time in a sample of children from 12 countries representing a wide range of human development, economic development and inequality. The secondary aim was to examine interactions of these associations between study sites. Methods: This multinational, cross-sectional study included 6228 children aged 9-11 years from the 12 International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment sites. Multilevel statistical models were used to examine associations between self-reported habitual breakfast frequency defined using three categories (breakfast consumed 0 to 2 days/week [rare], 3 to 5 days/week [occasional] or 6 to 7 days/week [frequent]) or two categories (breakfast consumed less than daily or daily) and accelerometry-derived PA and sedentary time during the morning (wake time to 1200 h) and afternoon (1200 h to bed time) with study site included as an interaction term. Model covariates included age, sex, highest parental education, body mass index z-score, and accelerometer waking wear time. Results: Participants averaged 60 (s.d. 25) min/day in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), 315 (s.d. 53) min/day in light PA and 513 (s.d. 69) min/day sedentary. Controlling for covariates, breakfast frequency was not significantly associated with total daily or afternoon PA and sedentary time. For the morning, frequent breakfast consumption was associated with higher proportion of time in MVPA (0.3%), a higher proportion of time in light PA (1.0%) and lower min/day and proportion of time sedentary (3.4 min/day and 1.3%) than rare breakfast consumption (all p ≤ 0.05). No significant associations were found when comparing occasional with rare or frequent breakfast consumption, or daily with less than daily breakfast consumption. Very few significant interactions with study site were found. Conclusions: In this multinational sample of children, frequent breakfast consumption was associated with higher MVPA and light PA time and lower sedentary time in the morning when compared with rare breakfast consumption, although the small magnitude of the associations may lack clinical relevance.
    • Associations between breakfast frequency and adiposity indicators in children from 12 countries

      Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Gillison, F.B.; Cumming, S.; Church, T.S.; Katzmarzyk, P.T.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Champagne, C.M.; Chaput, J-P.; Denstel, K.D.; Fogelholm, M.; et al. (Nature Publishing Group, 2015-12-08)
      OBJECTIVES: Reports of inverse associations between breakfast frequency and indices of obesity are predominantly based on samples of children from high-income countries with limited socioeconomic diversity. Using data from the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE), the present study examined associations between breakfast frequency and adiposity in a sample of 9–11-year-old children from 12 countries representing a wide range of geographic and socio-cultural variability. METHODS: Multilevel statistical models were used to examine associations between breakfast frequency (independent variable) and adiposity indicators (dependent variables: body mass index (BMI) z-score and body fat percentage (BF%)), adjusting for age, sex, and parental education in 6941 children from 12 ISCOLE study sites. Associations were also adjusted for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, healthy and unhealthy dietary patterns and sleep time in a sub-sample (n=5710). Where interactions with site were significant, results were stratified by site. RESULTS: Adjusted mean BMI z-score and BF% for frequent breakfast consumers were 0.45 and 20.5%, respectively. Frequent breakfast consumption was associated with lower BMI z-scores compared with occasional (P<0.0001, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.10–0.29) and rare (P<0.0001, 95% CI: 0.18–0.46) consumption, as well as lower BF% compared with occasional (P<0.0001, 95% CI: 0.86–1.99) and rare (P<0.0001, 95% CI: 1.07–2.76). Associations with BMI z-score varied by site (breakfast by site interaction; P=0.033): associations were non-significant in three sites (Australia, Finland and Kenya), and occasional (not rare) consumption was associated with higher BMI z-scores compared with frequent consumption in three sites (Canada, Portugal and South Africa). Sub-sample analyses adjusting for additional covariates showed similar associations between breakfast and adiposity indicators, but lacked site interactions. CONCLUSIONS: In a multinational sample of children, more frequent breakfast consumption was associated with lower BMI z-scores and BF% compared with occasional and rare consumption. Associations were not consistent across all 12 countries. Further research is required to understand global differences in the observed associations.
    • Beneficial postprandial lipaemic effects of interrupting sedentary time with high-intensity physical activity versus a continuous moderate-intensity physical activity bout: a randomised crossover trial

      Maylor, Benjamin D.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Orton, Charlie J.; Bailey, Daniel Paul; University of Bedfordshire (Elsevier, 2018-05-31)
      Objectives To compare the postprandial cardiometabolic response to prolonged sitting, continuous moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) followed by prolonged sitting, and interrupting prolonged sitting with hourly high-intensity PA breaks. Design Three-condition randomised crossover trial. Methods Fourteen sedentary and inactive adults aged 29 ± 9 years took part in three, 8-h conditions: (1) prolonged sitting (SIT), (2) a continuous 30-min moderate-intensity PA bout followed by prolonged sitting (CONT-SIT), and (3) sitting interrupted hourly with 2 min 32 s high-intensity PA bouts (SIT-ACT). The treadmill PA in conditions 2 and 3 were matched for energy expenditure. Two standardised test meals were consumed during each condition. Incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for each 8-h condition was calculated for glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations. Statistical analyses were completed using linear mixed models. Results Compared with SIT, SIT-ACT lowered triglyceride iAUC by 2.23 mmol/L ∙ 8 h (95% CI −4.33, −0.13) and raised HDL-C iAUC by 0.99 mmol/L ∙ 8 h (0.05, 1.93) (all p ≤ 0.038). There was no significant difference in triglyceride or HDL-C iAUC between CONT-SIT and SIT or SIT-ACT (p ≥ 0.211). There were no significant differences between conditions for glucose or insulin iAUC (p ≥ 0.504). Conclusions This study suggests that interrupting prolonged sitting with hourly high-intensity PA breaks acutely improves postprandial triglyceride and HDL-C concentrations compared with prolonged sitting, whereas a continuous moderate-intensity PA bout does not.
    • Breakfast consumption suppresses appetite but does not increase daily energy intake or physical activity energy expenditure when compared with breakfast omission in adolescent girls who habitually skip breakfast: a 7-day randomised crossover trial

      Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Seall, Claire; Tolfrey, Keith; ; University of Bedfordshire; Loughborough University (MDPI, 2021-11-26)
      With concerns that adolescent girls often skip breakfast, this study compared the effects of breakfast consumption versus breakfast omission on free-living physical activity (PA) energy expenditure (PAEE) and dietary intakes among adolescent girls classified as habitual breakfast skippers. The participants went through two 7-day conditions in a trial with a crossover design: daily standardised breakfast consumption (energy content: 25% of resting metabolic rate) before 09:00 (BC) and daily breakfast omission (no energy-providing nutrients consumed) until 10:30 (BO). Free-living PAEE, dietary intakes, and perceived appetite, tiredness, and energy levels were assessed. Analyses were linear mixed models. Breakfast manipulation did not affect PAEE or PA duration. Daily fibre intake was higher (p = 0.005; d = 1.31), daily protein intake tended to be higher (p = 0.092; d = 0.54), post-10:30 carbohydrate intake tended to be lower (p = 0.096; d = 0.41), and pre-10:30 hunger and fullness were lower and higher, respectively (p ≤ 0.065; d = 0.33–1.01), in BC versus BO. No other between-condition differences were found. Breakfast-skipping adolescent girls do not compensate for an imbalance in energy intake caused by breakfast consumption versus omission through subsequent changes in PAEE but may increase their carbohydrate intakes later in the day to partially compensate for breakfast omission. Furthermore, breakfast can make substantial contributions to daily fibre intake among adolescent girls.
    • Can physical activity support grief outcomes in individuals who have been bereaved? a systematic review

      Williams, Jane; Shorter, Gillian; Howlett, Neil; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Chater, Angel M.; University of Bedfordshire; Queen’s University Belfast; University of Hertfordshire (Springer, 2021-03-06)
      Background: In 2018, there were 616,014 registered deaths in the United Kingdom (UK). Grief is a natural consequence. Many mental health concerns, which can be identified as grief outcomes (e.g. anxiety and depression) in those who have experienced a bereavement, can be improved through physical activity. The objective of this review was to identify from the existing literature if physical activity can benefit grief outcomes in individuals who have been bereaved. Methods: A systematic review of nine databases was performed. Included studies (qualitative and quantitative) explored physical activity to help individuals (of any age) who had experienced a human bereavement (excluding national loss). Results: From 1299 studies screened, 25 met the inclusion criteria, detailing eight types of bereavement (parental (n=5), spousal (n=6), patient (n=4), pre-natal (n=3), later life (n=1), caregiver (n=1), multiple (n=4) and non-defined (n=1). Activities including yoga, running, walking, and martial arts were noted as beneficial. Physical activity allowed a sense of freedom, to express emotions, provided a distraction, and an escape from grief, while enhancing social support. Conclusion: There is some evidence that physical activity may provide benefit for the physical health and psychological wellbeing of those who have been bereaved, including when the loss has happened at a young age. This review is timely, given the wide-scale national loss of life due to COVID-19 and extends knowledge in this area. More research is needed to explore the benefits of physical activity for those who have been bereaved. In particular there is a need for well-designed interventions which are tailored to specific activities, populations and grief outcomes.
    • Can physical activity support young people after the death of a parent? the BABYSTEPs project

      Chater, Angel M.; Williams, Jane; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Howlett, Neil; Shorter, Gillian; University of Bedfordshire; University of Hertfordshire; Ulster University (2019-09-10)
      Background: Annually, 41,000 UK children and young people are parentally bereaved. Grief is an individual process and must be supported properly.  Many mental health aspects that cross over with grief outcomes (i.e. anxiety and depression) can be improved through physical activity. Yet there is limited research investigating whether physical activity can support bereaved individuals with their grief and what services are currently available. Methods: A systematic review of the literature (10 databases) and service provision (5 search engines) was performed.  Empirical studies (qualitative and quantitative) had to explore physical activity (of any type) to help individuals (of any age) who had experienced a bereavement (of any human, other than national loss).  Organisations which provide bereavement support to young people were contacted (via questionnaire and telephone) to record details about their service and if they offer physical activity support. Results: From 564 studies screened, 20 met the inclusion criteria, with 5 reporting using physical activity to support parental bereavement.  Running and martial arts were noted as types of beneficial activity.  Of the 373 organisations identified, 26 provided physical activity support (i.e. residential retreats, football) for bereaved young people.  Conclusion: There is evidence that physical activity can support the wellbeing of young people who have been parentally bereaved.  However, this evidence is limited, with just a small number of organisations offering physical activity.  There is a clear need for more research and services to understand and increase the use of physical activity to support young people following the death of their parent.
    • Cardiometabolic response to a single high-intensity interval exercise session versus breaking up sedentary time with fragmented high-intensity interval exercise

      Bailey, Daniel Paul; Orton, Charlie J.; Maylor, Benjamin D.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K. (Thieme, 2019-02-04)
      This study compared the effects of interrupting prolonged sedentary time with high-intensity physical activity (SED-ACT), a volume and duration-matched high-intensity interval exercise session followed by prolonged sedentary time (HIIE), and prolonged uninterrupted sedentary time (SED) on postprandial glucose, insulin and triglyceride concentrations. Twelve sedentary and inactive, but otherwise healthy, adults completed three, 6.5 h conditions in an incomplete counterbalanced order. During SED, participants sat continuously. For HIIE, participants completed 10 x 60 s cycling bouts at 90% maximum oxygen update (V̇O2max) with 1 min active recovery between bouts. In SED-ACT, 60 s cycling bouts at 90% V̇O2max were completed every 30 min (10 times in total) with 30 s of active recovery immediately before and after. Standardised meals were consumed at 0 h and 3 h and capillary blood samples were collected fasted and every 30 min. Compared with SED, postprandial glucose incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was significantly lower in SED-ACT by 1.91 mmol/L∙6.5 h (p=0.022) and triglyceride iAUC was significantly lower in HIIE by 1.02 mmol/L∙6.5 h (p=0.030). Interrupting sedentary time with high-intensity physical activity can lower postprandial glucose concentrations, whereas a HIIE session can lower postprandial triglyceride concentrations.
    • Daily-running exercise may induce incomplete energy intake compensation: a 7-day crossover trial

      Hough, John; Esh, Christopher John; Mackie, Paul Ian; Stensel, David J.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; University of Bedfordshire (Canadian Science Publishing, 2019-12-13)
      Understanding daily-exercise effects on energy balance is important. This study examined the effects of seven days of imposed exercise (EX) and no exercise (N-EX) on free-living energy intake (EI) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in nine men. Free-living EI was higher in EX compared with N-EX. Total and vigorous PAEE were higher, with PAEE in sedentary activities lower, during EX compared with N-EX. Daily-running (for 7 days) induced EI compensation of ~60% exercise-induced EE.
    • Does parental support moderate the effect of children's motivation and self-efficacy on physical activity and sedentary behaviour?

      Gillison, F.B.; Standage, M.; Cumming, S.P.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Rouse, P.C.; Katzmarzyk, P.T.; University of Bath; Pennington Biomedical Research Centre (Elsevier, 2017-07-13)
      Objectives: 1) To test whether parental support moderates the direct effects of children's motivation and self-efficacy on objectively measured moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time. 2) To explore differences in the relationships between boys and girls. Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Method: Data were collected from 430 9-11 year old UK children and their parents; parents selfreported on the support they provided to their children to be active (through providing transport, encouragement, watching, or taking part with their child), and children self-reported their motivation and self-efficacy towards exercise. MVPA and sedentary time were measured using accelerometers. Results: Both parent- and child-level factors were largely positively associated with children's MVPA and negatively related to sedentary time. There was no evidence of a moderation effect of parental support on MVPA or sedentary time in boys. Parental provision of transport moderated the effect of girls' motivation on week-day MVPA; more motivated girls were less active when transport was provided. Transport and exercising with one's child moderated the effect of motivation and self-efficacy on girls' sedentary time at weekends; more motivated girls, and those with higher self-efficacy were less sedentary when parents provided more frequent transportation or took part in physical activity with them. Conclusions: The results largely supported a model of the independent effects of parent and child determinants for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, but there was evidence that some types of parent support can moderate sedentary time in girls. Further research is needed to explore the causal pathways between the observed cross-sectional results.
    • Effect of breakfast omission and consumption on energy intake and physical activity in adolescent girls: a randomised controlled trial

      Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Plekhanova, Tatiana; Mandila, D.; Lekatis, Y.; Tolfrey, Keith; University of Bedfordshire; Loughborough University (Cambridge University Press, 2017-09-13)
      It is not known if breakfast consumption is an effective intervention for altering daily energy balance in adolescents when compared with breakfast omission. This study examined the acute effect of breakfast consumption and omission on free-living energy intake (EI) and physical activity (PA) in adolescent girls. Using an acute randomised crossover design, forty girls (age 13.3 ± 0.8 y, body mass index 21.5 ± 5.0 kg∙m-2) completed two, 3-day conditions in a randomised, counter-balanced order: no breakfast (NB) and standardised (~1962 kJ) breakfast (SB). Dietary intakes were assessed using food diaries combined with digital photographic records and PA was measured via accelerometry throughout each condition. Statistical analyses were completed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Post-breakfast EI was 483 ± 1309 kJ/d higher in NB vs. SB (P=0.025), but total daily EI was 1479 ± 1311 kJ/d higher in SB vs. NB (P<0.0005). Daily carbohydrate, fibre and protein intakes were higher in SB vs. NB (P<0.0005), whereas daily fat intake was not different (P=0.405). Effect sizes met the minimum important difference of ≥0.20 for all significant effects. Breakfast manipulation did not affect post-breakfast macronutrient intakes (P≥0.451) or time spent sedentary or in PA (P≥0.657). In this sample of adolescent girls, breakfast omission increased post-breakfast free-living EI, but total daily EI was greater when a standardised breakfast was consumed. We found no evidence that breakfast consumption induces compensatory changes in PA. Further experimental research is required to determine the effects of extended periods of breakfast manipulation in young people.
    • Effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following low and high glycaemic index breakfast consumption on glucose and insulin concentrations

      Bailey, Daniel Paul; Maylor, Benjamin D.; Orton, Charlie J.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; University of Bedfordshire (Springer, 2017-05-12)
      Purpose: Breaking up prolonged sitting can attenuate the postprandial rise in glucose and insulin. Whether such effects are dependent of the glycaemic index (GI) of the consumed carbohydrate is unknown. This study examined the acute effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following a low GI and a high GI breakfast on postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. Procedures: Fourteen adult males aged 22.1 ± 1.2 years completed four, 4 h experimental conditions: high GI breakfast followed by uninterrupted sitting (HGI-SIT), low GI breakfast followed by uninterrupted sitting (LGI-SIT), high GI breakfast followed by 2 min activity breaks every 20 min (HGI-ACT), and low GI breakfast followed by 2 min activity breaks every 20 min (LGI-ACT). Positive incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for glucose and insulin (mean [95% CI]) for each 4h experimental condition was calculated. Statistical analyses were completed using linear mixed models. Results: The sitting × breakfast GI interaction was not significant for glucose positive iAUC (P=0.119). Glucose positive iAUC (mmol/L4 h−1) was significantly lower in the activity breaks conditions than the uninterrupted sitting conditions (2.07 [2.24, 2.89] vs. 2.56 [1.74, 2.40], respectively, P=0.004) and significantly lower in the low GI conditions than the high GI conditions (2.13 [1.80, 2.45] vs. 2.51 [2.18, 2.84], respectively, P=0.022). Insulin concentrations did not differ between conditions (P ≥ 0.203). Conclusions: Breaking up prolonged sitting and lowering breakfast GI independently reduced postprandial glucose responses. This indicates that interrupting prolonged sitting and reducing dietary GI are beneficial approaches for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk.
    • Effects of frequency and duration of interrupting sitting on cardiometabolic markers

      Maylor, Benjamin D.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Stensel, David J.; Orton, Charlie J.; Bailey, Daniel Paul; University of Bedfordshire (Thieme, 2019-09-09)
    • Efficacy of a multi-component intervention to reduce workplace sedentary behaviour in office workers

      Maylor, Benjamin D.; Edwardson, Charlotte L.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Champion, Rachael B.; Bailey, Daniel Paul; University of Bedfordshire; University of Leicester (Wolters Kluwer, 2018-09-01)
      Objective: To investigate the efficacy of a work-based multicomponent intervention to reduce office workers’ sitting time. Methods: Offices (n=12; 89 workers) were randomised into an 8-week intervention (n=48) incorporating organisational, individual, and environmental elements or control arm. Sitting time, physical activity and cardiometabolic health were measured at baseline and after the intervention. Results: Linear mixed modelling revealed no significant change in workplace sitting time, but changes in workplace prolonged sitting time (-39 min/shift), sit-upright transitions (7.8 per shift) and stepping time (12 min/shift) at follow-up were observed, in favour of the intervention group (p<0.001). Results for cardiometabolic health markers were mixed. Conclusions: This short multicomponent workplace intervention was successful in reducing prolonged sitting and increasing physical activity in the workplace, although total sitting time was not reduced and the impact on cardiometabolic health was minimal. 
    • Metabolism and exercise during youth

      Tolfrey, Keith; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Smallcombe, J.; Loughborough University; University of Bedfordshire (HUMAN KINETICS PUBL INC, 2017-02-01)
      Three publications were selected based on the strength of the research questions, but also because they represent different research designs that are used with varying degrees of frequency in the pediatric literature. The first, a prospective, longitudinal cohort observation study from 7 to 16 years with girls and boys reports an intrinsic reduction in absolute resting energy expenditure after adjustment for lean mass, fat mass, and biological maturity. The authors suggest this could be related to evolutionary energy conservation, but may be. problematic now that food energy availability is so abundant. The second focuses on the effect of acute exercise on neutrophil reactive oxygen species production and inflammatory markers in independent groups of healthy boys and men. The authors suggested the boys experienced a "sensitized" neutrophil response stimulated by the exercise bout compared with the men; moreover, the findings provided information necessary to design future trials in this important field. In the final study, a dose-response design was used to examine titrated doses of high intensity interval training on cardiometabolic outcomes in adolescent boys. While the authors were unable to identify a recognizable dose-response relationship, there are several design strengths in this study, which was probably underpowered.
    • Physical activity duration but not energy expenditure differs between daily and intermittent breakfast consumption in adolescent girls: a randomized crossover trial

      Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Wells, Emma K.; Crawford, Natasha S.G.; Afeef, Sahar M.O.; Tolfrey, Keith (Oxford University Press, 2018-02-27)
      Background: It is not known whether breakfast frequency affects physical activity (PA) in children or adolescents. Objective: This study examined the effect of daily compared with intermittent breakfast consumption on estimated PA energy expenditure (PAEE) in adolescent girls. Methods: Using a randomized crossover design, 27 girls (age 12.4 ± 0.5 y, body mass index 19.3 ± 3.0 kg∙m-2) completed two, 7-day conditions. A standardized breakfast (~1674 kJ) was consumed every day before 09:00 in the daily breakfast consumption (DBC) condition. The standardized breakfast was consumed on only three days before 09:00 in the intermittent breakfast consumption (IBC) condition alternating with breakfast omission on the remaining four days (i.e., only water consumed before 10:30). Combined heart rate-accelerometry was used to estimate PAEE throughout each condition. Statistical analyses were completed using condition by time of day repeated measures analysis of variance. The primary outcome was PAEE and the secondary outcome was time spent in PA. Results: Daily estimated PAEE from sedentary, light, moderate and vigorous intensities and total PAEE were not significantly different between the conditions. The condition by time of day interaction for sedentary time (P = 0.05) indicated that the girls spent 11.5 min/d more time sedentary in IBC compared with DBC during 15:30-bedtime (P = 0.04). Light PA was 19.8 min/d higher during DBC compared with IBC (P = 0.05), which was accumulated during wake-10:30 (P = 0.04) and 15:30-bedtime (P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in time spent in MPA or VPA between the conditions. Conclusions: Adolescent girls spent more time in light PA before 10:30 and after school and spent less time sedentary after school when a standardized breakfast was consumed daily compared with intermittently across seven days. However, breakfast manipulation did not affect estimated daily PAEE. 
    • The prevalence of daily sedentary time in south Asian adults: a systematic review

      Dey, Kamalesh C.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Smith, Lindsey Rachel; Jones, Rebecca Louise; Bailey, Daniel Paul (MDPI, 2021-09-01)
      This study aimed to systematically review total daily sedentary time in South Asian adults. Seven electronic databases were searched, identifying relevant articles published in peer-reviewed journals between March 1990 and March 2021. The study was designed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Prospective or cross-sectional design studies reporting total daily sedentary time in South Asian adults (aged ≥18 years), reported in English, were included. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed, and the weighted mean total daily sedentary time was calculated. Fourteen full texts were included in this systematic review from studies that were conducted in Bangladesh, India, Norway, Singapore, and the United Kingdom. Pooled sedentary time across all studies was 424 ± 8 min/day. Sedentary time was measured using self-report questionnaires in seven studies, with a weighted mean daily sedentary time of 416 ± 19 min/day. Eight studies used accelerometers and inclinometers with a weighted mean sedentary time of 527 ± 11 min/day. South Asian adults spend a large proportion of their time being sedentary, especially when recorded using objective measures (~9 h/day). These findings suggest that South Asians are an important target population for public health efforts to reduced sedentary time, and researchers and practitioners should seek to standardise and carefully consider the tools used when measuring sedentary time in this population.
    • Supporting young people who have been parentally bereaved: can physical activity help and what services are available?

      Williams, Jane; Shorter, Gillian; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.; Howlett, Neil; Chater, Angel M.; University of Bedfordshire; University of Hertfordshire; Ulster University (2019-07-17)
      Background: Annually, 41,000 UK children and young people are parentally bereaved. Grief is an individual process and must be supported properly. Many mental health aspects that cross over with grief outcomes (i.e. anxiety and depression) can be improved through physical activity. Yet there is limited research investigating whether physical activity can support bereaved individuals with their grief and what services are currently available. Methods: A systematic review of the literature (10 databases) and service provision (five search engines) was performed. Empirical studies (qualitative and quantitative) had used physical activity (of any type) to help individuals (of any age) who had experienced a bereavement (of any human, other than national loss). Organisations which provide bereavement support to young people were contacted (via questionnaire and telephone) to record details about their service and if they offer physical activity support. Results: From 564 studies screened, 20 met the inclusion criteria, with five reporting using physical activity to support parental bereavement. Running and martial arts were noted as types of beneficial activity. Of the 373 organisations identified, 26 provided physical activity (i.e. residential retreats, football) support for bereaved young people. Conclusion: From this review, there is evidence that physical activity can support young people who have been parentally bereaved. However, this evidence is limited, with just a small number of organisations offering physical activity. There is a clear need for more work in this area, to understand and increase the use of physical activity to support young people following the death of their parent.