• Reflecting on the Stage 2 Health Psychology independent training route: a survey of trainee and graduate experiences of employability

      Bull, Eleanor; Newman, Kristina; Cassidy, Tony; Anderson, Niall; Chater, Angel M. (British Psychological Society, 2021-02-02)
      ‘This is a pre-publication version of the following article: [Bull E, Newman K, Cassidy T, Anderson N, Chater A (2020) 'Reflecting on the Stage 2 Health Psychology independent training route: a survey of trainee and graduate experiences of employability', Health Psychology Update, (in press).]’ A couple of the most common questions we may encounter from psychology students thinking about their career choices are: “What roles are there in health psychology?” and “How do I become a health psychologist?” Our discipline has made many advances into diverse spheres of employment, which then often leads to a response: “How long have you got?!” Health psychologists offer their knowledge and skills in psychological intervention, research, training and consultancy to improve health and wellbeing in a wealth of different settings, working at all levels from one-to-one with patients/clients/healthcare professionals, to groups, whole communities and populations. An increasingly wide range of stakeholders are recognising that they may benefit from collaborating with and employing a Health Psychologist, with Health Psychologists working in health and social care, education, culture, justice, and military, as well as working within global health partnerships through volunteering collaboratives (e.g. Byrne-Davis et al. 2017). The development of the Health Psychology and Public Health Network (HPPHN: Chater, 2014; McManus, 2014; Chater & McManus, 2016; renamed the Behavioural Science and Public Health Network, BSPHN in 2018) is also importantly strengthening our links with public health colleagues and creating new opportunities. Recent initiatives have also had success in raising the profile of Health Psychologists working in diverse areas, nationally and internationally. Some of these include Health Psychology Update’s new ‘Teaching, training and consultancy’ section (Cross, 2020), accounts of trainees’ experiences (e.g. Smith, 2018), the British Psychological Society (BPS) Division of Health Psychology’s (DHP) social media hashtag #DayInLifeOfHealthPsychology, the Oral History of UK Health Psychology project (Quinn, Morrison & Chater, 2020) and the BPS DHP Scotland’s case studies of Health Psychologists. Reflecting this diversity, in the UK there are currently several different options for training in health psychology.