• Culture and health

      Napier, A David; Ancarno, Clyde; Butler, Beverley; Calabrese, Joseph; Chater, Angel M.; Chatterjee, Helen; Guesnet, Francois; Horne, Robert; Jacyna, Stephen; Jadhav, Sushrut; et al. (Lancet Publishing Group, 2014-10-26)
      Planned and unplanned migrations, diverse social practices, and emerging disease vectors transform how health and wellbeing are understood and negotiated. Simultaneously, familiar illnesses—both communicable and non-communicable—continue to affect individual health and household, community, and state economies. Together, these forces shape medical knowledge and how it is understood, how it comes to be valued, and when and how it is adopted and applied. Perceptions of physical and psychological wellbeing differ substantially across and within societies. Although cultures often merge and change, human diversity assures that different lifestyles and beliefs will persist so that systems of value remain autonomous and distinct. In this sense, culture can be understood as not only habits and beliefs about perceived wellbeing, but also political, economic, legal, ethical, and moral practices and values.