• Discovery of a high-altitude ecotype and ancient lineage of Arabidopsis thaliana from Tibet

      Zeng, Liyan; Gu, Zhuoya; Xu, Min; Zhao, Ning; Zhu, Weidong; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Liu, Tianmeng; Qiong, Lha; Tersing, Tashi; Xu, Lingli; et al. (Elsevier, 2017-12-29)
      Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) has long been a model species for dicotyledon study, and was the first flowering plant to get its genome completed sequenced [1]. Although most wild A. thaliana are collected in Europe, several studies have found a rapid A. thaliana west-east expansion from Central Asia [2]. The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) is close to Central Asia and known for its high altitude, unique environments and biodiversity [3]. However, no wild-type A. thaliana had been either discovered or sequenced from QTP. Studies on the A. thaliana populations collected under 2000 m asl have shown that the adaptive variations associated with climate and altitudinal gradients [4]. Hence a high-altitude A. thaliana provides a precious natural material to investigate the evolution and adaptation process. Here, we present the genome of a new ecotype of A. thaliana collected in the Gongga County, Tibet (4200 m asl) (Fig. 1a), to demonstrate its evolutionary history and adaptation to highaltitude regions.
    • Evaluation of genetic diversity and population structure of Fragaria nilgerrensis using EST-SSR markers

      Liu, Jie; Zhang, Yichen; Diao, Xia; Yu, Kun; Dai, Xiongwei; Qu, Peng; Crabbe, M. James C.; Zhang, Ti-Cao; Qiao, Qin; Yunnan University; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-06-25)
      Fragaria nilgerrensis is a diploid wild strawberry widely distributed in Southwest China. Its white color and “peach-like” fragrance of fruits are valuable characters for the genetic improvement of cultivated strawberry plants. Its strong biotic and abiotic resistance and tolerance also enable it to survive in different habitats in the field. In this study, we evaluated the level of genetic variation within and between 16 populations with 169 individuals of F. nilgerrensis using 16 newly developed EST-SSR (expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeats) markers. The results show that the genetic diversity of this species was high, based on Nei’s genetic diversity (0.26) and polymorphic loci (0.41), although it is self-compatible and has clonal propagation. Significant genetic differentiation among populations was also detected by AMOVA analysis (Fst = 0.34), which could be indicative of little gene flow (Nm = 0.43) in F. nilgerrensis. The phylogenetic tree indicates that most of individuals from the same population have clustered together. These populations were not grouped based on the geographical distance, consistent with the Mantel test result (R2 = 0.0063, P > 0.05). All the populations were assigned into two ancestral groups, with some individuals admixed, suggesting ancestral gene flow had occurred between these two groups. Our developed EST-SSR markers as well as the genetic diversity and population structure analysis of F. nilgerrensis are important for genetic improvement in the breeding process. Moreover, the populations that contain high genetic diversity would be a priority for collection and conservation.
    • The genome and transcriptome of Trichormus sp NMC-1: insights into adaptation to extreme environments on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

      Qiao, Qin; Huang, Yanyan; Qi, Ji.; Qu, Mingzhi; Jiang, Chen; Lin, Pengcheng; Li, Renhui; Song, Lirong; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; et al. (NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016-07-06)
      The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) has the highest biodiversity for an extreme environment worldwide, and provides an ideal natural laboratory to study adaptive evolution. In this study, we generated a draft genome sequence of cyanobacteria Trichormus sp. NMC-1 in the QTP and performed whole transcriptome sequencing under low temperature to investigate the genetic mechanism by which T. sp. NMC-1 adapted to the specific environment. Its genome sequence was 5.9 Mb with a G+C content of 39.2% and encompassed a total of 5362 CDS. A phylogenomic tree indicated that this strain belongs to the Trichormus and Anabaena cluster. Genome comparison between T. sp. NMC-1 and six relatives showed that functionally unknown genes occupied a much higher proportion (28.12%) of the T. sp. NMC-1 genome. In addition, functions of specific, significant positively selected, expanded orthogroups, and differentially expressed genes involved in signal transduction, cell wall/membrane biogenesis, secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and energy production and conversion were analyzed to elucidate specific adaptation traits. Further analyses showed that the CheY-like genes, extracellular polysaccharide and mycosporine-like amino acids might play major roles in adaptation to harsh environments. Our findings indicate that sophisticated genetic mechanisms are involved in cyanobacterial adaptation to the extreme environment of the QTP.
    • Genomic analysis of field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) provides insights into mechanisms of adaptation to high elevation

      Geng, Yu-peng; Guan, Yabin; Qiong, La; Lu, Shugang; An, Miao; Crabbe, M. James C.; Qi, Ji.; Zhao, Fangqing; Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Ti-Cao; et al. (Springer Nature, 2021-07-22)
      Background: Understanding how organisms evolve and adapt to extreme habitats is of crucial importance in evolutionary ecology. Altitude gradients are an important determinant of the distribution pattern and range of organisms due to distinct climate conditions at different altitudes. High-altitude regions often provide extreme environments including low temperature and oxygen concentration, poor soil, and strong levels of ultraviolet radiation, leading to very few plant species being able to populate elevation ranges greater than 4000 m. Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) is a valuable oilseed crop and emerging model plant distributed across an elevation range of nearly 4500 m. Here, we generate an improved genome assembly to understand how this species adapts to such different environments. Results: We sequenced and assembled de novo the chromosome-level pennycress genome of 527.3 Mb encoding 31,596 genes. Phylogenomic analyses based on 2495 single-copy genes revealed that pennycress is closely related to Eutrema salsugineum (estimated divergence 14.32–18.58 Mya), and both species form a sister clade to Schrenkiella parvula and genus Brassica. Field pennycress contains the highest percentage (70.19%) of transposable elements in all reported genomes of Brassicaceae, with the retrotransposon proliferation in the Middle Pleistocene being likely responsible for the expansion of genome size. Moreover, our analysis of 40 field pennycress samples in two highand two low-elevation populations detected 1,256,971 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using three complementary selection tests, we detected 130 candidate naturally selected genes in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) populations, some of which are involved in DNA repair and the ubiquitin system and potential candidates involved in high-altitude adaptation. Notably, we detected a single base mutation causing loss-of-function of the FLOWERING LOCUS C protein, responsible for the transition to early flowering in high-elevation populations. Conclusions: Our results provide a genome-wide perspective of how plants adapt to distinct environmental conditions across extreme elevation differences and the potential for further follow-up research with extensive data from additional populations and species.
    • Spatial genetic and epigenetic structure of Thlaspi arvense (field pennycress) in China

      Guan, Yabin; Qu, Peng; Lu, Shugang; Crabbe, M. James C.; Zhang, Ti-Cao; Geng, Yu-peng; Yunnan University; Oxford University; Shanxi University; University of Bedfordshire; et al. (Genetics Society of Japan, 2020-11-11)
      (Received 13 May 2020, accepted 15 July 2020; J-STAGE Advance published date: 11 November 2020) Thlaspi arvense (field pennycress) is widespread in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. We estimated the genetic and epigenetic structure of eight T. arvense populations (131 individuals) in China using amplified fragment length polymorphism and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism molecularmarker techniques. We detected low diversity at both genetic (mean = 0.03; total = 0.07) and epigenetic (mean = 0.04; total = 0.07) levels, while significant genetic (FST = 0.42, P < 0.001) and epigenetic (FST = 0.32, P < 0.001) divergence was found across the distribution range. Using Mantel testing, we found spatial genetic and epigenetic differentiation, consistent with isolation-by-distance models. We also identified a strong correlation between genetic and epigenetic differentiation (r = 0.7438, P < 0.001), suggesting genetic control of the epigenetic variation. Our results indicate that mating system, natural selection and gene flow events jointly structure spatial patterns of genetic and epigenetic variation. Moreover, epigenetic variation may serve as a basis of natural selection and ecological evolution to enable species to adapt to heterogeneous habitats. Our study provides novel clues for the adaptation of T. arvense.